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Bahrain: A Second Man Killed as Police Attack First Victim's Funeral

This post is part of our special coverage of Bahrain Protests 2011.

Another young man Fadhel Al Matrook has been killed this morning as police attacked a funeral procession for another young man Ali Mushaima killed in yesterday's Day of Wrath protests in Bahrain.

The world watched in horror as tweeps who attended the funeral broadcast their observations on Twitter. The first victim was shot in the back, with gun shot; If that was not enough, his family and friends were not allowed to rest his body in peace. Police attacked the mourners at the government hospital, where they had gone to collect the body, with tear gas, and tweeps report hearing gunshots. Soon enough reports emerge of another man shot dead – yet another fatality of the indiscriminate police brutality, which shoots at protesters at close range as we have all seen from videos shared by netizens yesterday.

Here's a snap shot of reactions:

@BahrainRights: CONFIRMED: Fadhel Ali AlMatrook killed by bird shot used by police this morning at the funeral of the 1st martyr #Feb14 #Bahrain

@HusseinMohdBH: Fadhel Ali Almatrook, hit with birdshotgun at procession has become the second martyr. #feb14 #bahrain #Egypt #Jan5

@HusseinMohdBH: CONFIRMED: Fadhel AlMatrook killed by bird shot used by police this morning at the funeral of the 1st martyr #Feb14 #Bahrain #Egypt #Jan25

@mahmood: Big crowd awaiting the receipt of ali Mushaimi body for burial at mortuary. http://yfrog.com/h7r3rkbj

@mahmood: On the move to the cemetery now. Peaceful. No police yet. http://yfrog.com/gy86009320j

@mahmood: Police sternly to fire into crowd now. Unprovoked. #bahrain

@mahmood: Tear gas everywhere. Unprovoked. Some responses with rocks. Prevented by other demonstrators. Cottage diverted (cont) http://tl.gd/8raik2

@maryamalkhawaja: Fadhel Ali Almatrook, hit with birdshotgun at procession has become the second martyr source: alwefaq #feb14 #bahrain

@mahmood: Sorry where are we supposed to burry the fallen if police tear gas a funeral? Any ideas? #bahrain

@mahmood: I hear more birdshot. The preferred method of killing by the @moi_bahrain People unfettered. #bahrain #feb14

@mahmood: This is horrible. Eyes and lungs sore. People generally dispersing and finding their way to cemetery. Cortège (cont) http://tl.gd/8raq34

@mahmood: People still determined. Continue to stream through street. #bahrain #feb14 http://yfrog.com/h0iiiihj

@mahmood: 100s of cars by road to grave yard. Met Ebrahim sharif #Waad on way. Awaiting funeral. http://yfrog.com/h7437iwqj

@mahmood: On the move to the cemetery now. Peaceful. No police yet. http://yfrog.com/gy86009320j #bahrain #feb14

This post is part of our special coverage of Bahrain Protests 2011.

12 comments

  • […] Amira Al Hussaini, a Bahraini blogger that monitors citizen media for Global Voices Online, told Al Jazeera that there has been a huge outpouring of anger online in Bahrain. […]

  • […] (and how would I know?), but I do note that they will tend to include things like this quote from Amira Al Hussaini — “a Bahraini blogger that monitors citizen media for Global Voices Online” — who […]

  • Be it Bahrain or anywhere else, all of these government enforcers are people – not robots!

    Photo their faces and publish them; supply names when you can and urge others to provide the names when they are strangers. Let fellow countrymen know who these enforcers are so that they can shun them – have no business or social dealings with them if they will not be persuaded with words to cease initiating physical harm.

    Enforcers are the key to all governments! Without them all regulations/decrees/laws/edicts/etc are merely words. Shunning is a potentially very powerful non-violent tool for societal change, used down through the ages. It is included in Gene Sharp’s 2nd volume (of 3), “The Politics of Nonviolent Action”, Chapter 4, “The Methods of Social Noncooperation”.

    Street protests are not enough, as I wrote in general intended for use in North America in “Tax/Regulation Protests are Not Enough: Relationship of Self-Responsibility and Social Order” – http://selfsip.org/focus/protestsnotenough.html – but which is applicable in the general principles anywhere.

  • […] with the rest being foreign workers. The majority of citizens are Shia.   Online reaction   Amira Al Hussaini, a Bahraini blogger who monitors citizen media for Global Voices Online, told Al Jazeera that there […]

  • […] Amira Al Hussaini, a Bahraini blogger who monitors citizen media for Global Voices Online, told Al Jazeera that there has been a huge outpouring of anger online in Bahrain. […]

  • Angel

    Saludos Amira desde la Argentina. Les deseo que inicien el camino de la democracia, de la republica. No a las monarquias que es igual que dictaduras…, Hasta la victoria Siempre!!

  • […] through the crowd and the irony was not lost on those that filed updates via Twitter as reported here by Amira Al Hussaini for Global […]

  • […] Amira Al Hussaini, a Bahraini blogger who monitors citizen media for Global Voices Online, told Al Jazeera that there has been a huge outpouring of anger online in Bahrain. […]

  • […] do ‘Dia de Fúria‘ do Bahrein; ele foi motivado pelo funeral de Fadhel Al-Matrook, morto depois que as pessoas que velavam [en] o 1º manifestante morto, Ali Mushaima, tiveram que enfrentar a força repressiva da polícia […]

  • […] Bahrain is one of the latest countries to stage protests in the so-called Arab revolution time-tableinspired by uprisings in Tunisa and Egypt. Police have forcefully quashed demonstrations that began on February 14 across the country, and both videos and photos of the crackdown are dodging internet censors, and making their way around the web (hashtag (#14Feb). At least two people have died. […]

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