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Iran: Protesting in the name of Egypt and Tunisia

This post is part of our special coverage of Tunisia Revolution 2011.

Iranian opposition leaders, Mir Hussein Mousavi and Mehdi Karubi, have applied for permission to stage a rally in support of revolts in Egypt and Tunisia, on February 14 (25 Bahman) their websites said.

This poses a dilemma for the Iranian government who themselves stamped mass protests one year ago. The news motivated several cyber activists to add their ‘green touch’ to the internet, sharing their ideas and hopes for a new era for the Iranian protest movement.

A 25 Bahman (14 February) Facebook page was recently launched, and already more than 18,000 people have joined. On this page there is information for protesters to print and distribute, and videos including newscasts about the Egyptian protest movement.

The poster below invites people to demonstrate in Tehran on February 14 and also mention Article 27 of the Iranian Constitution which provides for freedom of assembly without arms, and as long as the assemblies “are not detrimental to the fundamental principles of Islam.”

Poster calling to demonstration on February 14

Several people have written comments and shared their opinion on the upcoming demonstration such as suggesting slogans about the economic corruption of the Iranian regime, similar to those for protests in Tunisia and Egypt.

Cyber activists have also gone to work in several other big cities such as Shiraz, Isfahan and Tabriz local Facebook pages.

Khodnevis reports that protesters have begun to write “25 Bahman, our Anger Day” on bank notes.

Sokhanesabz writes [fa]:

… three days before 14 February (25 Bahman) on the anniversary of the revolution, we should go to the rooftops and chant “Down with the dictator”. We should start inform people several days before the demonstration not just the night before.

This post is part of our special coverage of Tunisia Revolution 2011.

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