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Southeast Asia: Reactions to Egypt protests

Using the #egypt hashtag, let’s read what twitter users in several Southeast Asian countries have been tweeting in reaction to the ongoing Egypt protests.

Bangkok, Thailand

StSatire: Are those soldiers on tanks mummies? How could they stay so still during the clash between 2 sides? #Egypt
fatibee: How world leaders can call themselves leaders watching #Egypt unravel is unbelievable!
vahncitis: Real protesters: Are peaceful, Carry no weapons, Do not ride horses or camels, Don't attack journalists, Don't carry police IDs.#Egypt
Snowiigist: RT @Thai_Talk: To bed. My thoughts are with the brave people of #Egypt fighting for liberty and freedom. Strength, safety and victory to you.
freakingcat: In awe about the bravery of the Egyptian Pro Democracy demonstrators who still hold out on Tahir Square #egypt

This picture compares the Egypt protests and the Red Shirt protests in Thailand. The Red Shirts are anti-government protesters who are demanding the resignation of the Prime Minister

Photo from Facebook

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

red1Oon: learn this from #Egypt. Do not allow your govt to rule you up to 30 years
syanzuhri: It started from #Tunisia , followed by #Beirut and #Egypt and now #Yemen. Spreading like cancer.
isodera: #Egypt: Why is everyone asking why the army is not doing anything to stop the agents provocateurs? REMEMBER WHO IS THEIR COMMANDER IN CHIEF?
otosamajohan: I think US should stop meddling in other countries affairs. #egypt
red1Oon: it is no longer up to #USA, it is all up to you now dear #Egypt. Stand your ground with compassion and love for justice, you shall prevail.
MsXyda: RT @htgamal I can't wait to see what's going to happen in a few hours in Tahrir sq. How much longer will the world wait to do sth?! #egypt
IAmIzmir: Events unfolding in #Egypt are making me angry. So called ‘pro-Mubarak’ forces are killing & getting violent with anti-Government people.
hazri: Admire d courage of d democracy ppl in #Egypt. Would we hv d courage & strength when we hv 2 stand 4 our rights & principals in Malaysia?
fauzishaffie: @JShahryar Cannot describe how agonizing it is to hear women and children being fired upon by Government people. #Egypt #jan25 #Obama

From former Prime Minister and popular blogger Mahathir Mohamad:

Should these revolutions succeed there would be new Governments. But it is worthwhile to remember that change is not always for the better. It is incumbent upon those bent on effecting change to have some idea about the kind of Governments they want. Otherwise they may get the same kind of Governments that they try so hard to be rid off. This is because most leaders upon achieving power would change and would forget the struggles and sacrifices which enabled them to be in power. Power corrupts as we all know.

Jakarta, Indonesia

Some twitter users are comparing the situation in Egypt to the 1998 protests in Indonesia which eventually led to the resignation of President Suharto who ruled the country for three decades.

richardbera: Watching the situation deteriorating in #Egypt. Clashes btwn pro n anti #Mubarak groups. People are dying. Very sad. #PrayForEgypt
deprithazoraya: Deepest condolences for all the innocent people who were killed in #egypt :(
ke2mesr: RT @natalixia: RT @unspun: Why are Indonesian tuips so strangely silent about #Egypt? You'd think there'd be much empathy given what we went thru in 1998
JihanJi: RT @MarissaAnita: The attack on anti-govt protesters in #Egypt may well remind us of the final attempt to regain power by Soeharto in '98.
L_lidya: Where is the military when the weary civilians needs safety and peace??? #Egypt #Cairo #Mubarak
n_zanki: @khadijapatel One Indonesian woman has been killed in #Tahrir clashes. This is a call for Jihad, #Egypt !
DonnySaputro: RT @Jnoubiyeh: The courage and determination of the oppressed will triumph over the iron fist of a dictator. #Egypt #Jan25 #Mubarak

Alveta Rorio reacts

I've been watching Al Jazeera coverage of events unraveling in Egypt for several days now. I have very little knowledge of the nation's history nor the earlier breakout in Tunis that seemed to trigger this extraordinary revolution. Nonetheless, the courage and determination of the people there is amazing. They stand up together against guns, tanks, fighter jets.

Yet, it's also baffling that the government has been so stubborn. How is it possible to maintain the status quo after such movement?

Manila, Philippines

Manila netizens are describing the Egypt protests as similar to the People Power Revolution in 1986 which toppled the Marcos dictatorship. Filipinos are celebrating the 25th anniversary of this historic event this month.

majoro64: army plays role in PH 1986 revolt. #egypt army must do the same NOW for democracy! Long Live Democracy #jan25 #tahrir
zenhernandez: Images from #Egypt are just both shocking and sad. It's as if they no longer have a government. No authorities to stop the violence.
checachecs: I hope nothing happens to the pyramids in #Egypt ☹☹☹ to visit the pyramids of Giza is in my #bucketlist ✈
findingjemo: RT @kdpsuarez: If u love someone, let go. Same applies to ur “love” of #Egypt, Mubarak. Let go of ur hold on power n save ur country. Cut and cut cleanly.
ra_quinones: Stop throwing molotov to the Museum, lets preserve history. OMG what is happening to the people in #egypt
inbetweencabs: RT @DominicKavakeb: It's so vital that world understands this is not a divided #Egypt. This is the state attacking the people. #jan2
migsbassig: Restraint is a beautiful word. But don't counsel that to people who are ready to die. #Egypt

Suman Latik writes about the Egypt protests and the Philippines’ EDSA Revolution

Is it a coincidence that nearly 25 years ago, it was the Philippines in the news working peacefully to throw out a dictator and here we are today following the March of Millions in Egypt as they call for President Hosni Mubarak to step down from power after three decades of rule?

How time flies, but life remains a cycle. Did Egyptians learn from Filipinos? There have been several other peaceful uprisings in the name of democracy since the 1986 EDSA People Power Revolution. It is interesting to see if those efforts have not been in vain.

3 comments

  • Let’s hope the movement is forward for us all no matter where we live.

  • […] Visit link: Southeast Asia: Reactions to Egypt protests · Global Voices […]

  • I agree with those Egyptian voices. How can the world leaders just stand and watch? The only thing they do is “condemn the atrocities” or whatever. When it was Iraq, the US flew in there and blew the place up – “freeing the oppressed people”. Now the people are oppressed as well and what do they do? Nothing.

    Elli

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