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Jordan: Twitter Reactions to Nine Per Cent Fuel Hike

Jordan's government announced year-end fuel price hikes. The cost of gas, referred to as benzine, was raised 9 per cent, while the price of diesel and kerosene was raised by 6pc. Many Jordanians expressed their ire through sarcasm and humor.

Muneer Saifi referenced the end-of-year timing:

Happy new year with 9% raise in feul prices, enjoy 2011 #JO

Zalmasri tweeted:

End of year present from the government. More than 9% increase on fuel prices. Happy new year #jo

To which Basem Aggad responded:

A well deserved 1, we earned no better! #JO RT @zalmasri End of year present from the government. More than 9% increase on fuel prices..

Loia Taha discussed possible, humorous alternatives to fuel:

9% fuel prices raise!! I bet we'll see lots of horses and donkeys down the streets.. much cheaper, I may get one myself very soon #jo

Janabi suggested another option:

Bye Bye Octane 95, hello Octane 90 :( #JO

To which Loai Taha responded:

Bye Bye Benzine… hello water: RT @janabi: Bye Bye Octane 95, hello Octane 90 :( #JO

Ali Dahmash, though, launched serious criticism of the government's decision:

@YasserBurgan @primeministry the calculation of the Oil prices in Jordan seems anonymous and unreal, it's not justified

Yasser Burgan responded:

@AliDahmash We are energy importing country. This is only a reflection of the international oil prices. @PrimeMinistry #Jo

And continued:

@AliDahmash Nevertheless, prices at the pump in #Jo is less than 50% of prices in #Greece. @primeministry

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