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Iran: Bloggers discuss Wikileaks documents

The Wikleaks Cablegate documents exposed shady ties between Iran and Afghanistan; inside information about the Iranian regime and opposition; and fear in the Arab region of Iran's nuclear policy. Iranian bloggers reacted to these revelations, sometimes with irony, sometimes with conspiracy theories in mind, and sometimes seriously.

Natour Shahr says the documents in Wikileaks speak of Iran's supreme leader Ali Khamenei‘s illness and the former president Ali Akbar Rafsanjani's aim to replace him. They also speak of the brewing conflict between Iranian leaders, which shows that the regime is not as stable as it pretends. According to the blogger [fa]:

The Wikileaks documents show that more than 80 percent of people voted for Karroubi and Mousavi. It proves that the Iranian government's attempt at legitimacy is useless… The documents also show that behind the smile of Arab countries hides a tooth, and Iran's relationship with them is very fragile.

Iran Vatanam mentions [fa] that the Austrian ambassador in Tehran called the female Minster of Health in Islamic Republic a “puppet without any self confidence”.

Gameron writes [fa] with irony that one of the Wikileaks documents show that the USA prevented the return of the “Hidden Imam” [Mahdi,the final Imam of the Twelve Imams in Shia Isalm]. three times.

Said Saman writes that Julian Assange and his “independent” Wikleaks is going to war with a wooden sword against a plastic dragon. The blogger has doubt about the sincerity of Assange's aim and writes [fa]:

For far less important revelations, the secret service have killed and decapitated people in Washington, London, Berlin and around the world. Who is this Assange to have such security protection?… The White House, The Pentagon raised their voices but cannot catch even the source of these revelations…

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