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Mexico: Heavy Rainfall Causes Flooding in Veracruz and Tabasco

Mexico is currently living one of the worst natural disasters to hit the country in years. Mexican newspaper Milenio [es] confirmed that in two states affected by flooding, Veracruz and Tabasco, more than 25 thousand people had to evacuate their homes, as the “Temazcal” and “Cerro de Oro” dams could soon overflow because of expected heavy rainfalls.

Twitter users have commented on the cruel situation their homeland is experiencing, like Marisol Montúfar (@hereismarisol), who wrote [es]:

Viviendo sentimentos encontrados, amo la lluvia pero es una verdadera pena lo que esta pasando en #Tlacotalpan

Feeling conflicted, I love the rain but what is happening in #Tlacotalpan is a pity

NicteTapiaKim (@NicteTapiaKim) compares [es] the situation to Haiti's earthquake:

Cuando lo de Haiti, camiones y camiones llenos de ayuda, y ahora que nosotros la necesitamos no hay!!! #veracruz #lluvias #inundacion

When [the earthquake] in Haiti happened, trucks and trucks full of help came, and now that we need it there is nothing #veracruz#lluvias#inundacion

According to the News Agency Prensa Latina [es], the economic losses are worst than expected: “Mexican authorities report millionaire losses caused by rain floods, 25 municipalities in the State of Veracruz will need at least 131 million dollars in order to repair their damaged infrastructure.”

Last week, to show solidarity and under the pressure of a spontaneous and insistent crowd, President Felipe Calderón walked through Tlacotalpan, Veracruz,  touring about one kilometer across the water and the flooded streets. According to El Universal [es], in the streets the water level reached between 1 to 1.5 meters.

Mexican President Felipe Calderon walking through the flooded streets in Veracruz, Mexico. Photo by Flickr user Gobierno Federal, under an Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAline 2.0 Generic Creative Commons license

On Twitter, Caderon's visit caused a discussion as well. Manuel (@mdgo80) informed [es]:

Dicen que el agua en #Veracruz no supera los 30 cms, lo midieron con las rodillas de #Calderón

They say that the water in #Veracruz does not go higher than 30 cms,  they measured it with #Calderon ‘s knees

Some users are skeptical, as they believe Calderón was posing for the press rather than showing solidarity by walking through the flooded streets. Mario Vázquez (@MMarioVazquez) wrote [es]:

¿A que fué Felipe Calderon a Veracruz? R= a tomarse la foto

Why did Felipe Calderon go to Veracruz? Answer = to take a picture

But Pachicle (@Pachicle) has a different perspective [es]:

Esta Enderezando el Rumbo Calderon, Agarra a la Barbie y se Mete al Agua en Veracruz a las Calles Inundadas, No Kiere Perder la Presidencia

Calderon is straightening his course, he caught “The Barbie” and he goes into the flooded streets in Veracruz. He does not want to lose the presidency

4 comments

  • Joe Caruso

    Hello,

    I was wondering whether anyone knows when it is predicted that people the water will be cleared from Tlacotalpan, or whether things are so bad they aren’t even thinking that far ahead at this stage?

    Thanks,

    Joe

  • […] and the strong rains from tropical storm Agatha. Heavy rainfall also affected Mexico, causing flooding in the states of Veracruz and Tabasco in September. In November, tropical storm Thomas hit Costa […]

  • […] and the strong rains from tropical storm Agatha. Heavy rainfall also affected Mexico, causing flooding in the states of Veracruz and Tabasco in September. In November, tropical storm Thomas hit Costa […]

  • Rachel Page

    There have been many floods lately. Indeed the climate is changing. Bankruptcy Attorney San Antonio

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