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Ghana: The Black Stars on the brink of making history

A fan in Accra celebrated after Ghana defeated the in June. Photo by Stig Nygaard on Flickr.

Ghana, Africa's only hope in 2010 FIFA World Cup, faces Uruguay today. African bloggers hope that the Black Stars of Ghana will not let Africa down.

Blogging from South Africa, Kenyan blogger Rebecca Wanjiku notes that Ghana support has reached fever pitch:

It is the talk of town, buzzing on twitter, facebook; people just can’t stop talking about Ghana and what would happen if it upsets Uruguay: Africa will have won and reached a new football high.

Everybody is an expert on football now, and hypothesizing on what Ghana should or should not do is common. This morning I took a taxi and the driver could not stop talking, giving me his run down on Ghana and how Michael Essien must be feeling bad that he is not in the team.

All of Africa and many destinations beyond are behind you, writes Gayle:

Good luck–they who should not be named–because all of Africa, and many destinations beyond, are behind you.

Let the Stars be Black tomorrow night!

Abena says that Ghanaian players have a huge burden to carry for the whole of Africa:

Not only is it drama-filled but it is (supposedly) our time…Africa's world cup. The fact that the Black Stars remain the only African team in the actual competition may make it hard to believe that it is indeed the time for the continent. Currently, our Stars have the incredible burden of the whole of Africa on their shoulders. It has been an absolute delight getting emails and text messages from friends all over the continent and the world declaring their support for the Black Stars.

South Africans are rallying behind the team, which they now call BaGhana. Well, and Kenyans, too, are flying Ghana colours:

I just heard that Kenyans are flying Ghana colours and it appears South Africans are affectionately referring to the Black Stars as “BaGhana” – a witty take on their not-so successful football team “Bafana Bafana”.

Nana Kofi Acquah writes a poem for the Black Stars:

Countless people glued
To a glass of moving men
The shouts and waves
The screams and chants
Cheering and adoring men of valour
Endowed with skill and agility
Elegantly protecting and honouring
The waving flag of red, gold and green
Dancing to the cheers of a moving wind

I see thousands of flags in hands
All dancing in the air
Waiting for this moment of pride
All white shirted men of the Stars
Running to the corner flag
Dancing to celebrate
It is a goal!

And another one titled, The Black Stars of Africa:

In the midst of so much despair
where all hope seem to be lost
the human spirit seeks repair
from an inner recess, at all cost

in all African villages crowds grow
a lone Black Star hope awakening
as the crowd enjoys the soft glow
of the screen on that cool evening

the vuvuzela sounds like a bee hive
the Hope of Africa is being revived
in the Black Stars of Ghana to strive
but it is the Hope of Africa survived

Fans are showing their support for Ghana by wearing Ghana's Twibbon on the Internet.

Global Voices Online has organised a live chat of the match between Ghana and Uruguay. African bloggers, join us!

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