Close

Support Global Voices

To stay independent, free, and sustainable, our community needs the help of friends and readers like you.

Donate now »

See all those languages up there? We translate Global Voices stories to make the world's citizen media available to everyone.

Learn more about Lingua Translation  »

Iran: Who steals bronze statues?

It seems Iran is the land of surprises and there seems to be no end for them. International and Iranian media report that religious motives appear to be behind the recent theft of 11 bronze statues of Iranian national heroes.

These statues include Mohammad Moin statue, a prominent literature scholar, (photo, right, from Mehr news site) and Sattar Khan‘s statue, a key figure in the Iranian Constitutional Revolution , (photo, left, from Mehr News) that have been stolen from the capital's public parks.

Mokhtasatehonar, says [fa] with irony that:

stealing statues in such numbers is becoming an ordinary thing and people started to get used to that…Mayor officials instead of stopping this robbery explaining to media and reporters that it is a group of thieves with high ability and planning…as if Iranians did not understand that stealing a 400kg statue in daylight is not a work of ordinary thieves.

Another blogger, Ebhamlink, has published the photographs of the statues that have not been stolen yet.

And Noghrei Nevesht writes [fa]

probably these statues have not been stolen but a religious leader ordered they got collected from public spaces. If they wanted to do that in a transparent way, people will probably protest and riot. Now it is done in the name of robbery.

The blogger wonders whether they have been stolen or made to “disappear.” Either way, it is a sad story.

12 comments

Join the conversation

Authors, please log in »

Guidelines

  • All comments are reviewed by a moderator. Do not submit your comment more than once or it may be identified as spam.
  • Please treat others with respect. Comments containing hate speech, obscenity, and personal attacks will not be approved.

Receive great stories from around the world directly in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the best of Global Voices!

Submitted addresses will be confirmed by email, and used only to keep you up to date about Global Voices and our mission. See our Privacy Policy for details.

Newsletter powered by Mailchimp (Privacy Policy and Terms).

* = required field
Email Frequency



No thanks, show me the site