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Brazil: A Snapshot of Campus Party 2010

cpartySão Paulo became a meeting place for geeks, cyberactivists and Internet addicts last month, during the Brazilian round of the Campus Party. The technology, digital culture and LAN party event took place from 25 to 31 January 2010.

CampusPartyMT [pt] was among the blogs covering the event. They have published some photos of Campus Party 2010:

Photo brought by Flickr user CampusPartyMT taken by @lucasninno. Used under a Creative Commons license.

Photo by Flickr user CampusPartyMT taken by @lucasninno. Used under a Creative Commons license.

Photo brought by Flickr user CampusPartyMT taken by @crisguse. Used under a Creative Commons license.

Photo by Flickr user CampusPartyMT taken by @crisguse. Used under a Creative Commons license.

Photo by CampusPartyMT used under a Creative Commons license.

Photo by CampusPartyMT used under a Creative Commons license.

Photo brought by Flickr user CampusPartyMT taken by @lucasninno. Used under a Creative Commons license.

Photo by Flickr user CampusPartyMT taken by @lucasninno. Used under a Creative Commons license.

Bloggers of CampusPartyMT. Photo taken by @lucasninno. Used under a Creative Commons license.

Bloggers of CampusPartyMT. Photo taken by @lucasninno. Used under a Creative Commons license.

According to official statistics there were more than 90,000 visitors over the week. Ana Maria Modesto, one of those who attended the event, shares her experience on the Notas de Rodapé [pt] blog:

O barato de tudo isso é o contato feito com os palestrantes e as palestras , que em muito me enriqueceram, o aprendizado no campus blog.Ainda mais quando se ouve ao vivo, grandes nomes das mídias sociais, participantes da bibliografia do meu projeto de pesquisa em Ciências Sociais, sobre o impacto da Social Media na sociedade brasileira. Ouví-los e ser ouvido e respondido por eles foi demais.

The coolest things were networking with the lecturers, and the lectures themselves, which I found really illuminating, including the CampusBlog one. It’s even better when you can listen to the big names in social media live. These people featured in the bibliography of my Social Sciences research project on the impact of Social Media in Brazilian society. Being able to listen to them, and for them to listen to me in turn and respond to my questions was awesome.

Photo by Flickr user liacarreira. Used under a Creative Commons license.

Photo by Flickr user liacarreira used under a Creative Commons license.

Photo by Flickr user amfdesigner used under a Creative Commons license.

Photo by Flickr user amfdesigner used under a Creative Commons license.

Photo by Flickr user amfdesigner used under a Creative Commons license.

Photo by Flickr user amfdesigner used under a Creative Commons license.

Cyber-flowers in Campus Party. Brought by Techguru 2.0 blog.

Cyber-flowers in Campus Party, by Techguru 2.0 blog.

Kevin Mitnick, the greatest hacker in the world. Photo by ManoelNetto on Flickr. Used under a Creative Commons license.

Kevin Mitnick, the world's greatest hacker. Photo by ManoelNetto on Flickr. Used under a Creative Commons license.

Lawrence Lessig, founder of Creative Commons. Photo by senomoto_br on Flickr. Used under a Creative Commons license.

Lawrence Lessig, founder of Creative Commons. Photo by senomoto_br on Flickr. Used under a Creative Commons license.

Photo by senomoto_br on Flickr used under a Creative Commons license.

Photo by senomoto_br on Flickr used under a Creative Commons license.

Photo by senomoto_br on Flickr used under a Creative Commons license.

Photo by senomoto_br on Flickr used under a Creative Commons license.

On the other hand, the blogger at Mondo Cubano [pt] criticized this year's event, which she found lukewarm:

Tirando poucas ações relevantes e bem feitas, a #Cparty virou uma grande lan house de promoções bizarras. As empresas caem lá sem ter a menor noção de como agradar o grande público e fazem ações estúpidas. […]

Entendo que é uma grande arena para ações de marketing, e sinceramente até acho que se bem feitas elas também poderiam agregar valor à #Cparty. Mas o cerne do evento: a pesquisa, a troca de conhecimento, de experiência e o networking foi massacrado por adesivos, camisetas e panfletagem.

Apart from a few relevant and well-executed ideas, #cparty has just become a massive lan house full of bizarre promotions. Companies descend on it without having the slightest notion of how to please the general public, and they just provide gimmicks […]

I appreciate that this is a great arena for marketing, and I honestly believe that if it were done well these companies could also add value to #cparty. But the heart and soul of the event, research, the exchange of knowledge, experience and networking, were massacred by a deluge of stickers, T-shirts and leaflets.

The fun is not over yet. Fernanda Nogueira blogs about the Campus Party Experience [pt] an itinerant version of the event which will visit more than 100 Brazilian cities over the first half of the year. For a week, a bus and tent with up to 150 computers will allow the local population to have first-hand experience of technology and the web, and will encourage debate about technology and digital culture.

Apesar de terem algumas cidades em mente, a organização pensa em criar um processo de candidatura, onde assim como nas Olimpiadas, a própria população defenda a realização do evento na sua cidade.Além disso, cada cidade deverá criar também um comitê gestor que ficará responsável pela a cessão do local de realização do evento, todo o desembaraço burocrático (licenças, alvarás, etc), garantia de visitação por parte de estudantes e grupos de excluídos (camponeses, idosos, portadores de deficiência,etc) e manutenção de um telecentro focado em inclusão 1.0 (promoção do primeiro contato com o computador) e 2.0 (promoção do uso de serviços web e de publicação de conteúdos em blogs, fotologs, videologs e redes sociais).

Although they have some cities in mind, the organization committee intends to open the event up to an application process similar to that of Olympics, whereby people will have to argue the case for holding the event in their city.

In addition, each city will create a steering committee responsible for providing a venue for the event, dealing with all matters of bureaucratic clearance (permits, licenses, etc.), guaranteeing that it is open to students and marginalized groups (peasants, the elderly, people with disabilities, etc.) and maintaining a “telecenters” focused on digital inclusion 1.0 (promoting first contact with computers) and 2.0 (promoting the use of web services and content publishing through blogs, photo blogs, vlogs and social networks).

360° view of the Campus Party. Photo by Flickr user mariacarol, used with permission.

Campus Party in 360°. Photo by Flickr user mariacarol used with permission.

A 3D image of the Campus Party main room made by Rene de Paula is available from this link.

This article was proofread by Maisie Fitzpatrick.

2 comments

  • Diego,

    Thanks for the great coverage! Very cool pictures.

    Fernando

  • […] to focus on social innovation and science. In 2008 Campus Party spread to Latin America, first in Brazil, then in Colombia, El Salvador, and Mexico. You can read bloggers’ reviews from many of the […]

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