Close

Support Global Voices

To stay independent, free, and sustainable, our community needs the help of friends and readers like you.

Donate now »

See all those languages up there? We translate Global Voices stories to make the world's citizen media available to everyone.

Learn more about Lingua Translation  »

Japan: Latest survey on poverty destroys the prosperity myth

One Japanese in six is living in poverty says the latest Welfare Ministry report [en]. According to OECD figures [en], Japan has one of the highest poverty rates in the developed world and is 4th after only Mexico, Turkey and the U.S.

By Flickr id: Ushio Shugo

By Flickr id: Ushio Shugo

In September, Makoto Yuasa, Secretary-general of Anti Poverty Network (反貧困 Han Hinkon) [ja], had already pointed to the problem explaining Japan's poverty issue in this way [en]:

Ever since the high economic growth of the 1960s, Japan has inhabited the myth that all Japanese people belong to the middle class. However, Japanese-style employment, which is at the heart of this myth, has been transformed by the increase in nonregular employment and other factors, and a growing number of Japanese live in poverty.

As many debate on their blogs, nowadays the income gap in Japan is far from being new. When the economic Bubble burst in the early 90s it revealed the weaknesses in the Japanese system and since then many experts say the country has never completely recovered from recession.
Ysaki suggests how this problem has always existed but have been regarded by most Japanese as a somebody else's problem.

この記事を最初に見た時に、私は部落問題に近いな、と感じたんです。それは、私たちの隣に確実にその問題があるのに、知らないふりをする。見ない振りをし、無関係を装ってきた。

When I read the news I felt that this problem is very similar to that of other discriminated groups in Japan.
Although there is certainly a problem and it is one very close to us we pretend not to see it and in doing so, we have come to convince ourselves that it is none of our business.

Miyabi-tale considers that the issue has a long history and that responsibility must be traced back to political inertia. 

驚くべきは、この数字が今年ではなくて数年前のデータでさえすでに7人に1人いるという事実で、リーマンショック以降の世界恐慌の不景気のあとでは今現在では少なく見ても5人に1人はそれくらいの値になっていると考えられることである。自民政権下では、公式発表的に「日本に貧困はない」「一億総中流家庭」なんていうキャッチコピーもあったわけだが、現実はまったくそうでないということが改めて浮き彫りにされたわけである。

What's surprising is data from a couple of years ago showed that one person in seven lived in poverty. There are some who consider it a positive that, despite the deep recession which affected the whole world as a consequence of the Lehman Brothers collapse, only one in five people nowadays is poor.
Under the LPD government, slogans such as ‘In Japan there is no poverty’ or ‘A total of one hundred million middle-class households’ used to be announced but it has again become apparent that this was far from being the truth.
By Flickr id: caribb

By Flickr id: caribb

There are those though who prefer to consider the other side of the coin.
Ukkii hopes that this black period in the Japanese social and economic history would bring a return of the strength of spirit for which the Japanese people are renowned.

し・か・し
国の景気が良くなるまでこのままでいいのだろうか
貧しかった戦後の日本国民は、みな必死で頑張ってここまでよくなってきています
あの時代のハングリー精神があればきっと国を変えれなくとも企業の生き残りは可能だと思います
私は一社員でありますが社長のような視点で物事を考えていくことを目標としています
視野を広げればいろんなことに発見や改善が見えてくるからです
ハングリー精神なんて言葉、現代では死語なのかもしれませんが
僕はこの言葉を提唱していきたいと思います

B U T
Is it all right for things to go on like this until the country's economy recovers?
When the Japanese people were poor after the war, they did their best with no hesitation and managed to improve the situation as we now know.
If only we again had the same HUNGRY SPIRIT of that time I am sure that even if we can't immediately change the whole country, keeping our companies strong and competitive is still possible.
I am an employee but I try to see things from a CEO's point of view because if we are far-sighted, there are many discoveries and improvements to be made, which can be applied to a variety of things.
The phrase ‘hungry spirit’ is perhaps forgotten nowadays but I'd like to put it forward again.

8 comments

  • […] doch ich möchte ihn gern wieder bekannt machen.” Dieser Beitrag erschien zuerst auf Global Voices. Die Übersetzung erfolgte durch Hans H. Knauf, Teil des “Project Lingua“. Die […]

  • saki

    ホームレスの写真を掲載されておりますが、相対的な貧困の意味をわかっておられますか?
    http://www2.ttcn.ne.jp/honkawa/4654.html

    ホームレスとは全然関係ないですよ。

    センセーショナリズムを基調にした記事をお書きになりたいなら、エロ記事とかオタク記事を翻訳すると英語圏の読者には喜ばれますよ。

    それと、格差ということなら、

    ジニ係数や、List_of_countries_by_income_equality

    などをウィキから参考にされるとよいかもしれません。

    • Sakiさん、私のポストを読んでくれてありがとうございました。
      センセーショナリズムのつもりではありませんでした。ただ、最近発表されたOECDの調査の結果に関しては、日本のブロガーはどう思っているのかを紹介したかったです。
      尚、リンクを添付してくれてどうもありがとうございます。勉強になります。

  • saki

    コメントありがとうございます。

    日本のブロガーにもいろいろいます。
    できれば、様々な意見を翻訳していただきたい。
    偏って誤った情報ばかり提供して、論争のあるブログはその旨併記していただけるとありがたいです。

    また、論題に関して理解がないと、ブロガーの言葉を誤解する読者がでてくる。
    この投稿ではホームレスの写真が多様されているので、ここでいうpoverty とはホームレスか、ホームレス並みの貧困のことを言っているように思われるのではないでしょうか?
    あるいは、それを意図されたのでしょうか?

    • Sakiさん、繰り返しになるかもしれませんが、偏った情報を提供するつもりではありませんでした。
      複雑な話題なので、日本のブロゴスフィアには様々な意見があるはずですが、この場合、問題に関しての悲観的な視点と楽観的な視点を紹介しようと思って以上のポストを書きました。
      いつもあるポストを書く前に、一体の問題の表裏を紹介するという意図があって、何十本も読みます。
      でも、翻訳する価値のあるポストを知っていれば、リンクを教えてください。お勧めもウェルカムです!
      我々はあくまで一部のポストしか紹介できませんが、もっといいのあれば読みたいし、紹介したいと思いますよ!

      写真に関してなのですが、もちろん相対的な貧困は抽象的な概念なので、絵で表すことが難しいと分っています。
      ただ、GVの記事はFlickrユーザの写真を紹介する場にもなりますので、以上の写真を選びました。

      • saki

        写真に関して、ユーザーの写真を紹介したいお気持ちはわかりますが、しかし、どう考えても、ここで言われている貧困の意味が違う。

        題名も、
        Latest survey on poverty destroys the prosperity myth
        となっています。

        しかし、相対的貧困率が高いからと言ってホームレスが多いとも限らず、また繁栄していない、とも限らない。
        (アメリカの例を見て下さい)

        また、日本が相対的貧困率が低いというmythなんてあるのでしょうか?

         相対的貧困率の意味を誤解して、日本の繁栄の神話が崩れる、とセンセーショナリズムに走った、ように思えます。

        日本にも救済すべき貧困者の問題がります。また、ホームレスの問題もある。また、繁栄に翳りもある。

        しかし、この相対貧困率は、こうした問題を反映しているとは限りません。

        その意味で、タイトルも写真も誤解を招くものだと思います。

  • […] (and we know which direction).  Much of the writings and reports on political issues such as poverty and environment, have no credibility at all in that they are mostly opinions without objective […]

Join the conversation

Authors, please log in »

Guidelines

  • All comments are reviewed by a moderator. Do not submit your comment more than once or it may be identified as spam.
  • Please treat others with respect. Comments containing hate speech, obscenity, and personal attacks will not be approved.

Receive great stories from around the world directly in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the best of Global Voices!

Submitted addresses will be confirmed by email, and used only to keep you up to date about Global Voices and our mission. See our Privacy Policy for details.

Newsletter powered by Mailchimp (Privacy Policy and Terms).

* = required field
Email Frequency



No thanks, show me the site