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Martyrs of Iranian protests remembered online

Neverforget.usDozens of Iranian protesters have been killed since demonstrations against the controversial results of the presidential election in June swept the country. On Neverforget.us, a new multimedia website, photos and short biographies of more than 70 people killed have been published.

One of these victims was Neda Agha Soltan who died with her eyes wide open. Her death was captured on video by bystanders and uploaded to the internet. Her last moments transcended from citizen media to mainstream media, reaching millions of people.

Iranian citizens have continued to use the internet to immortalize other Iranian martyrs of the protest movement (a.k.a. “Green Movement”). The opposition claims the number of murdered demonstrators is more than 70 people. Some were killed under torture after arrest, while others were shot down in the streets.

In spite of government secrecy, names and pictures of some of the fallen have emerged.

toufanpourOne of the biographies on Neverforget.us says:

Toufanpour, Amirhossein (photo above) 1977-2009
Amirhossein, a father with a seven-year-old daughter, disappeared on June 15. After searching Tehran hospitals for a week to no avail, his distraught family identified him among photos of corpses at the coroner’s office. Marks on his corpse included a deep gash in the head, a broken arm, and gunshot wounds in the arm, but the exact cause of death was unclear.

Another website, Green Martyrs, also provide [fa] information about the ‘martyrs’ (temporarily offline at time of publication).

Here is a video to remember the martys and the suffering of their mothers:

As we are watch these photos and films, there are hundreds of Iranian political prisoners such as Mohammad Ali Abtahi, a blogger and reformist politician, who face unknown futures in Iranian prisons.

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