Close

Support Global Voices

To stay independent, free, and sustainable, our community needs the help of friends and readers like you.

Donate now »

Bahrain: Too Much Traffic

Elkhelid is fed up of traffic in Bahrain: “Bahrain’s construction projects and road renovations have created a problem: major intersections are bottle necks.”

Recent Middle East & North Africa Stories

Top World Stories

1 comment

  • Tony Mitchell

    I agree that the amount of traffic in Bahrain is high and yes, there are many bottlenecks which contribute to lengthy delays on the roads.
    The main problem, however, is the total lack of order by the drivers in Bahrain (irrespective of where they come from) whose selfish actions contribute more to the jamming of the roads.
    The government initiated the English system of yellow grids on intersections and posted signs to state that they must be kept clear – ALL drivers ignore these and enter intersections when there is no possibility of exiting them, thus blocking the way for other traffic. Also, single lane on-ramps and off-ramps from major roads (and non-major ones) are clogged by selfish motorists pushing in because they are not prepared to wait in line. This action creates even more delay and it happens everywhere.
    There is no order on the roads in Bahrain – it is total chaos and it is amazing that drivers manage to stay in their lanes, although the amount of lane changing that takes places is incredible, especially when the traffic is stationary.
    The raodworks and improvements to the traffic system are very welcome and will help to alleviate the flow of traffic but the government need to target the attitudes and selfishness of the drivers with a combination of publicity and penalty if the traffic situation is to ever improve here.

Join the conversation

Authors, please log in »

Guidelines

  • All comments are reviewed by a moderator. Do not submit your comment more than once or it may be identified as spam.
  • Please treat others with respect. Comments containing hate speech, obscenity, and personal attacks will not be approved.

Receive great stories from around the world directly in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the best of Global Voices!

Submitted addresses will be confirmed by email, and used only to keep you up to date about Global Voices and our mission. See our Privacy Policy for details.

Newsletter powered by Mailchimp (Privacy Policy and Terms).

* = required field
Email Frequency



No thanks, show me the site