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Kazkahstan: Public administration discussed by bloggers

The bloggers are trying to understand what is happening in the country and how adequate is the public administration in Kazakhstan.

Megakhuimyak thinks over the future of the local political elite by tracing the trends in the their education [ru]:

In the beginning of the 20th century and in the end of the 1970s, the elite of Kazakhstan studied in Russia, particularly in Moscow. Then, in the early 1990s, youngsters studied in Turkey. Starting from 1998, it became popular to study in Europe or the US. I expect that in 5-10 years only Harvard and other Western universities’ graduates will be in the top league of the officials in Kazakhstan, which eventually will have its effect later on.

Thousand-pa looks back and notices [ru]:

After 19 years of the rule of president Nazarbayev, it can be concluded that he was quite successful in establishing the class of large capitalists. The situation with middle class is far more complicated. As for poverty, it still exists as it did 19 years ago. In the big cities the poverty level has decreased, but in the smaller towns and rural areas it, probably, has grown even more than it used to be [at the dawn of independence].

Sadenova is surprised that the governmental system is still stable despite its poor-quality administration bureaucracy [ru]:

Our country is so amazing. It is a country of non-professionals. Wherever you go you find terrifying “human resources”. Such country technically is supposed to fail, but it doesn’t for some reason…

[While the world economists warn that the second phase of crisis is possibly coming] the officials in Kazakhstan are already discussing post-crisis “innovative development”. Most likely, in Kazakhstan even the crisis has specific national features! But a friend of mine roughly explains what does this optimism come from: “The oil price has grown up a little, and these people felt more relaxed, loosened their ties and had a shot of whiskey”.

Also posted on neweurasia.

2 comments

  • […] Also posted on Global Voices. […]

  • Sadenova’s friend hit the nail on the head. Another acquaintance of mine in Almaty recently expressed relief that the end of the crisis was now in sight as oil prices have increased. He considered them likely to continue to increase.

    I’m not betting on it.

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