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Kazakhstan: Turmoil Royale

Rakhat Aliev, former son-in-law of the Kazakhstani president, former ambassador in Austria and former Kazakh oligarch, sentenced to 40 years in jail for abduction of the people, leadership of the mafia-type organization and attempt of the coup, keeps on creating a “democrat's” image by leaking discrediting materials against top officials.

Earlier this week his book “The Godfather-in-Law” has been issued. It's first edition was published in Germany, in German language. As Aliev himself says, [ru]

Europe still has little knowledge of what is happening in Kazakhstan. This fact allows EU politicians to put a blind eye on repressions and righs violations.

There are few comments to this post. Some of them are glad about the publication. heil-jonny says he'll definitely buy a book, while mimi7777777 offers translation services.

yeresim is skeptical [ru]:

I could have regarded this book differently, if the author were a consistent fighter against the regime. But you – you have become what you are thanks to your fother-in-law. And now you try to present yourself as a democrat, using discrediting materials against this man. Are you so naive to think that the Kazakh people will be happy to see you again, ever? I don't think so. And this is your traged.

thousand_pa tries to clarify [ru]:

Does this book tell the reader how a man on public service managed to get large enterprises in private property, to own Nurbank [commercial bank], media and advertising holdings, shreholdings in a number of Kazakhstani and foreign companies?

Besides, the checking of users who leave positive comments Aliev's blog shows that most of them are fake accounts with no entries and a couple of comments in personal history.

Also posted on neweurasia.

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