Close

Support Global Voices

To stay independent, free, and sustainable, our community needs the help of friends and readers like you.

Donate now »

See all those languages up there? We translate Global Voices stories to make the world's citizen media available to everyone.

Learn more about Lingua Translation  »

Sri Lanka: What Happened To The Money?

Rising of Ceylon asks some questions regarding the international aids that have flown into Sri Lanka after the Tsunami in December 2004: “what happened to all those money which came to the country in bucks? What happened to all those plans which the government had??? Where did they all go???”

3 comments

  • Most of the money were misused and failed to reach the affected in many parts of the Srilankan sea coasts. There was an open accusation by opposition that all the money allocated for Hambantota was transferred from banks to the private account of President Mahinda Rajapaksa. A court order filled by JVP activist in Srilanka high court prevented money allocated for northern and eastern coast developments. Still many coastal villagers in north and east who were affected by 2004 December Tsunami are living in temporary shelters. Former President Mrs Chandrika Kumaratunga who was accused by Srilankan high court of corrupt land transactions, should answer to this Tsunami expenditures. All her foreign bank transaction should be investigated, as she is now living in UK.

  • priyal

    hey Rezwan i want know witch world are staying go to sri lanka and see what happend to the money

  • Cheeze

    Much of the money were ‘pledges’.

    People who have no idea of international affairs, wont know this.

    Only 4% of the total pledged funds reached sri Lanka. Just because USA pledged 50 billion that doesnt mean it all came? It could be paid out in instalments, or it will take its own sweet time. May not come at all, a pledge is a promise to donate.

Join the conversation

Authors, please log in »

Guidelines

  • All comments are reviewed by a moderator. Do not submit your comment more than once or it may be identified as spam.
  • Please treat others with respect. Comments containing hate speech, obscenity, and personal attacks will not be approved.

Receive great stories from around the world directly in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the best of Global Voices!

Submitted addresses will be confirmed by email, and used only to keep you up to date about Global Voices and our mission. See our Privacy Policy for details.

Newsletter powered by Mailchimp (Privacy Policy and Terms).

* = required field
Email Frequency



No thanks, show me the site