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Afghanistan: Prison, Poverty and Politics

While the Obama administration has announced that an additional 17,000 troops will be sent to Afghanistan to confront the rising insurgency, Afghan bloggers keep talking about the daily challenges facing Afghans such as a women in prison, poverty and political tensions.

Baktash Siawash, a Kabul-based journalist and blogger writes [en] about the hardships of imprisoned women. The blogger says:

Women’s prisons: currently in Northern Province of Kunduz ten women with eight children in age of 6 to 10 are prisoners. Two Small and dark rooms with a lavatory is called prison. Pul-e-Charkhi prison is the Most Famous prison in Afghanistan located in Kabul province the Capital of Afghanistan: prisoner women don’t have good situation in Kabul prison too. The reporters do not have the permission to visit the Pulcharkhi women’s Prisoners section.

Afghancorner, an Afghan blogger based in the USA writes [en] that Afghanistan is a mess and that there is tension with the government of the United States. The blogger adds:

Afghan president Hamid Karzai speaks on several topics concerning Afghanistan (Taliban, Pakistan, upcoming presidential elections and his government’s relations with newly elected US leadership) with Al Jazeera’s David Frost. It worth mentioning that international community has expressed its concern over corruption in Afghanistan, and Obama has criticized Afghan government for lack of leadership and management. In his latest interview, Karzai confess of pale relations with Obama administration.

Christian Bleuer, a PhD student from Australia writes [en] in Ghosts of Alexander that Jennifer McCarthy, a PhD research student in London has decided to live on an actual Afghan budget for a month to raise awareness and some funds. And she will provide the narrative of what that’s like in her blog.

Not everything is not dark and sad in Afghanistan Thruafghaneyes, an Afghanistan based blogger writes [en] that Mirwais Mohsen is one of the first Afghan skaters, a brand new sport in Kabul.

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