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Malaysia: Worst flooding in years

Malaysia’s State of Sarawak suffered from severe flooding last week. The two hardest hit areas were Kuching and Sibu. Almost 10,000 people were forced to move to higher ground because of rising water level. In some parts of the state, flood waters rose to 14 feet. Why Hello World? provides the initial roundup of articles and pictures about the disaster.


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Kuching

japanese-aliav wrote about the flash floods in Kuching:

“Last Sunday (11.01.2009), there's a big flood at my area and around Kuching city center. Everyone was shocked and surprised about it because it came with a sudden and I was lucky to live at 7th floor and I can see my neighbors who live in 1st floor are a bit unfortunate. On Monday (12.01.2009), around 5.30 pm past, the flood started to come and everyone was panic including me because we need to close our shop earlier and I have to wait for my father to come to pick me up but due to flood, the road started with traffic jam. Everyone wants to reach home so the road is full of cars; doesn't matter breaking road rules as long as they can reach home. So, I went back almost 7 pm and my father and mother is waiting for me on the other side of my work place so I rushed while splashing on the water and quickly get into my car.”

Check out the video posted by japanese-aliav:

Beaned heard that the flooding was the worst in decades:

“I wanted to post this entry last night but the wireless connection next door was down, probably shorted by the flood water, so now I'm blogging from work. The flood receded at about 8pm last night and the remains of the drifted papers, plastic bags and even the rubbish bins can be seen all over the road this morning.

“My aunt said that it's been a LONG while since a flood this severe last happened like a few decades ago. Sigh, I hope the raining season will stop soon or somehow because we can't really hang out with the roads flooding like lakes.”

Some residents are blaming the barrage project constructed by the government because it failed to control the floods. Anilnetto also criticizes property developers:

“Greed drove developers to clear and build on low-lying swampy lands. Not only are these buildings expensive, they are poorly built and prone to cracks and sinking. In certain areas, drainage was not even properly built. The local councils are equally to be blamed for granting permits to build in low-lying areas. Sarawak is a large state with a relatively small population. Couldn’t they approve in places that, though further away, are less prone to floods and other problems?”

kuching

kuching2
Pictures by mic5220 courtesy of PhotoBorneo.com through the blog of Why Hello World?

Sibu

Fantasy World writes about the non-stop rains in Sibu:

“Sibu has been raining and raining since Friday until now for non-stop. The non-stop rainfall has caused the flood again. *sigh* The weather forecast said that the rain will be continuing until this coming Wednesday.”

My Longkang wants authorities to immediately address the flood problem:

“This afternoon my car almost stalled while another four cars who were ahead of me stalled along Pedada Road. I spent the past few nights preparing for the worst. I have received calls from friends whose houses were flooded and property damaged. Farmers lost their crops. People unable to go to work and children unable to go to school.

“In the past it used to be once in a long space of time and could be blamed on the quirks of mother nature. It has now become so common place that it is like a house guest that just won’t go home.

“Do the Sarawak people really deserve this kind of treatment?

“Is it a wonder then that the people should feel something deep down in their souls when they see the muddy swirling waters flood the roads, surge into their homes and disrupt their lives.

“Steps should be taken immediately to address the flood problem. I pray some where out there is still some one in authority who still feels something for the woes of the Sarawak people.

“How many times do we have to experience floods before something concrete is done?”

Rubber Seeds believes the flooding was not a simple natural disaster:

“…to many of us we who have gone through so much hardship and trouble with the frequent, we now actually hate ourselves for still staying behind in this flood-prone town. We hate ourselves for electing, term after term, the Ministers and YBs who have done nothing or not doing enough for the people.

“Can any body tell me when can Sibu be free from flooding? Some politicians will argue that flooding is a natural disaster. You may be right some times, but not all the time. This present flood is definitely not a natural disaster. I notice the water level at the Rajang River is not very high these few days. I dare say the very poor drainage system at the affected areas is the major cause for the flood.”

sibu

sibu2
Pictures from Rubber Seeds courtesy of Why Hello World?

4 comments

  • dez

    thanks for using my entry as a snippet.. the flood has receded now in kuching but word has it that it’ll get worst during the first few days of CNY due to the rising tides.. bummer~

  • […] week, flooding hit several areas in the Sarawak State of Malaysia. More than 8,000 people in the Bau District were evacuated in 24 […]

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