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South Africa: Is poligamy compatible with democracy?

Opalo's Weblog comments on Jacob Zuma‘s intention to take on a third wife: “We have seen (with deep embarrassment) the sorry affair that is the life of the King of Swaziland. Let not the same become of the leader of a democratic, and supposedly modern, republic like South Africa”.

2 comments

  • sabelo nxumalo

    There are many parts of the world where poligamy is practiced and there is no “embarrassment”such as the moslum world. The Arab world has it but becouse they have money no one ever says the things they say to King Mswati. Has any one ever bothered to call for a reforandum in Swaziland to ask what the Swazis want? Thanks to our wise Kings we have never had war and enjoy a relative high standard of living compared to a lot of African countries regardless what the media say . Democracy is about the people and Zuma can take his wifes it is the people who will see the charactor of the man and vote for him. Every woman must have the right to marry a poligamist on not. This is a family too and a big African family with a few mothers but a father always and banning it will not make us white and better.
    True demacracy is what Zuma straggled for not one culture to dominate another such that if white people take one wife fine. FYI -In Swaziland one can take a wife in both civil and traditional systems as a woman you have that right guranteed by the contitusion to say no to traditional .
    sabelo
    Swaziland

    • ken

      I am against the idea of having more than wife. In places where the practice is commonplace – like in the Muslim world – women lack basic rights. Polygamy takes away women’s individuality and a right to have the exclusive attention of their husbands. It also raises men to a pedestal, making them feel even the more superior to women.

      I say we do away with the practice and grant equality to our sisters and mothers – not just in schools, at the workplace and in the public sphere, but also in the bedroom.

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