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Malaysia: Praise for the mysterious masked man

Journalist and activist Muhamed Syukree Hussain of Malaysia died of heart attack last month. He was 28. Syukree was always present in the weekly candlelighting vigil protests in Malaysia. Everybody knew him because he always wore a mask. His sudden death surprised his fellow activists and bloggers.

syukree

Anilnetto met Syukree in the weekly protests against Malaysia’s Internal Security Act:

“Though I don’t know much about him personally, Syukree always came with a mask on his face. Yes, a real mask, the one Halloween kind. Strangely enough, last Sunday, attention was focused on him. He used to walk around and mingle with the crowd and we had got used to his light-hearted, fun-filled gestures. Coincidently, as Zorro was speaking, he sat just right up where Zorro was addressing the crowd. Zorro, for the first and sadly the last time, introduced Syukree to the crowd.”

Estrelita pays tribute to Syukree:

“Tonight's vigil was dedicated to Syukree Hussain. Some took the opportunity to say a few words about him. It was a strange feeling to be witness to a sense of having lost a friend. I didn't know him. I didn't have to. Just hearing what was said about him told me that he was “special”. He stood up for what he believed in and he lived his life as he wanted to. Not many of us can attest to doing that – not 100% – at least not in the way that Syukree did! In that sense, Syukree was true to himself and I don't really feel sad that he died so young. He lived a full life and made every second of his 28 years count! He will be remembered. He left his mark on this earth.”

Syukree organized the “Breasts no bombs” campaign in Kuala Lumpur. His other blogs are the following: Seruan Keadilanon, and Kuala Terengganu Untuk Pakatan Rakyat. Check also his Flickr page and Facebook profile.

mask
From the blog of zorro-unmasked

Malay Mail hails Syukree as a courageous individual:

“What’s intriguing is that, by all accounts, he traversed a “surreal” existence in living a truth he believed in. Many others say these are their beliefs too, only that Syukree was more “courageous” in the non-conventional manner he conveyed them.”

Ricecooker remembers Syukree:

“We all know Syukree as a guy who would never be anywhere without his laptop, and when he got the chance, he’d be immediately on-line, doing whatever he liked to do, including putting up bizarre comments on peoples pages, all pretty much designed to annoy and infuriate.

“Syukree was beaten-up a couple of times too. We all remember the infamous incident at the Teratak Dangdut gig years ago, when he pissed off a bunch of hardcore kids and yet still attended their gig! He was also punched at Bau-Bau Cafe once.”

E Contrario believes Syukree led a colorful and productive life:

“The young man was struggling to cope with challenges at the crossroad of our era. I sensed that he was trying to reconcile with many contradictions in life. His writing revealed his anxiety with big issues like religion, politics, philosophy, etc. His mind became the battlefield of these conflicts.

“Sukyree led a colourful and productive life—and had certainly left among his circle of friends a lasting mark in their memory. His pains and dilemma too had stirred us emotionally. His silent cries impel us to look into the inner self of our generation of troubled youth. His departure also reminds me: their agile life can be so fragile too.”

Check this Youtube video clip of Syukree:

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