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Kazakhstan: History, Culture and Internet

While Ukraine is taking a principle stand towards its history and calling Holodomor (famine of the 1930s) genocide of the nation, undertaken by the communist regime, Kazakhstani authorities are very quiet on the comparable disaster of the Stalin era, when more than 30 percent of the Kazakhs died. Schriftsteller says [ru]:

Famine in Kazakhstan was not simply genocide, but also ethnocide, because it left significant changes in the Kazakh culture: the type of economy, settling , habitation and clothing changed dramatically. The previous complex of Kazakh nomadic culture, which was present in 1920s was eliminated during the years of famine.

Alim-atenbek looks at the development of Kazakhstani cinematography. One of the recent Kazakh film, “The Gift to Stalin” opened the South Korean film festival, while another movie, “The Tulip”, has taken the CNN APSA Viewers Choice Award [ru]:

3 movies that I saw recently in the cinema were Kazakh ones… Next year, KazakhFilm studio plans to make 15 movies, and if half of them would be of comparable quality, it would be possible to speak about resurrection of the domestic cinematograph.

While Russian blogosphere discusses theft of money at creation of secondary schools’ websites, Megakhuimyak suggests taking a glance at how state funds are spent in the sphere of e-government [ru]:

51 billion tenge, which makes up 425 million dollars were spent for this e-government portal (http://www.e.gov.kz/wps/portal)

Cheerful-husky continues the Internet-related debate and finds out that most of the Kazakhstn-related Google ads lead to the religious websites [ru]:

Link “I hate my life” always grabs your attention. Apparently, it brings you to some Studentstan website, which appears to be a Christian organization. Love.kz has nothing to do with dating – it’s also a mission and love they speak about is the God’s one.

Also posted on neweurasia

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