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Serbia: Does Barack Obama Mean Hospitality for the World?

Serbs are hurt because the United States supported the act of Kosovo Metohia province independence early this year. They have a moderate hope for change in American diplomacy led by the new president Barack Obama. Although former State Department officials like Richard Holbrooke may be appointed, it looks like Serbs and the world outside America can expect a new age of hospitality and cooperation as a consequence of the latest presidential election in the United States.

Nemanja Avramović claims there would be no crucial change in American politics towards Serbia. Still, he is optimistic (SRP):

Barack Obama […] is the new president of the United States. I know this probably does not mean anything for Serbia (directly), because U.S. policy towards Serbia and Kosovo will not change. Although if the new president of the United States really fulfills his election promises, the situation would be at least a little better all over the world, and therefore indirectly in Serbia as well.

Sivi Soko (“Gray Falcon”) thinks (SRP) Obama's “Change” came out to be like Serbian president Boris Tadić‘s “Better Life” campaign – a story for election use only:

The daily newspaper [Glas Javnosti] published [an essay (SRP)] by [Srđa Trifković] about how the result of elections in America would impact Serbia. […]

[…] However, we learn that the “transition” team has appointed some former employees of [Bill Clinton]'s State Department. One of them now works for the [Albright Group] (company [owned by Madeleine Albright]). […]

“The only way for some big change to happen in American relations with the Balkan area would be if Serbia acted strongly with aggressive diplomacy efforts. With this government in Belgrade, this is, of course, completely impossible.”

In another post, Sivi Soko adds:

Have you ever thought that the euphoria with which some Americans perceive Barack Hussein Obama may be similar to the euphoria with which some Serbs experienced [Slobodan Milošević]? Both politicians promised changes.

[…]

The choice of [Rahm Emanuel] for head of the office could be a good thing, because he was one of the prominent members of the Serbian committee in Congress. But the real test will be Obama's choice for head of diplomacy. If he chooses [Richard Holbrooke], [the future relations with Serbia] would be [very bad].

Rivera jokes (or not) (SRP):

[…] I am fed up with our domestic problems and issues […]. Thus – let's go straight to Havana! [Fidel Castro] has lived to see to another American president. It is the first time he said something nice about one of them – “Obama was an intelligent fellow.”

Think for a moment how the meeting between Fidel and [Raul Castro] and the American president Barack Obama would look like on the coast [of Cuba]. They would drink coca-cola and rum with a lot of ice. They would be saying cheers to one another. Barack would say:

“Fuck it, forget what happened. Let's move on!”

To this – cheers!

6 comments

  • Freedom, Democracy

    Have any of you outside the great USA, Serbs, Iraqis, Afghans, etc. etc. etc. ever thought of the idea of just respecting others in your own country and surrounding areas and adopting good-hearted and basic democratic principles and maybe the USA won’t have to step in and save another region of the world from utter self-destruction. Please Please, those of you around the world do not forget Europe would be a desolate Nazi hell-hole if our boys in stars and stripes didn’t step in. People are so quick to forget what happened only 60 years ago. WE WILL NEVER FORGET OUR WWII SOLDIERS; THE GREATEST HEROES IN THE PAST 2000 YEARS! Zivela Slobodna Srbija i Draza i Kralj Petar II. Ziv je Draza umro nije, kada je Srbija Democracije!

  • One can say: “Serbia has proven to be the new Nazi Regime of the Balkans.”

    Then I don’t know why you wrote that comments on Global Voices are moderated. You also tell people to treat others with respect. And comments containing hate speech, obscenity, and personal attacks will not be approved.

    I don’t think you would publish a comment from someone saying that Global Voices has proven to be the new Nazi website of the internet.

    Karl Haudbourg
    Serbia’s Ambassador To The World
    http://www.ambassador-serbia.com

  • It’s interesting to hear what Serbia thinks of the US Presidential campaign. Cheers for the info.
    Raf
    http://uzar.wordpress.com/
    http://newzar.wordpress.com/

  • Enrave’s comment.

    First of all, I agree with Enrave’s comment, Serbia is a country with many different minorities. But, that’s about all that’s good here. Enrave went on to say that there is still pretty much active ethnic cleansing done now in Serbia. So is this a guy that has finally found a link? Unfortunately, not at all. Next up is the claim that “Serbs are deprived and hateful people, and a lot of people agree on that.” That’s simply not true. Yes, we’ve all seen similar comments in the past — but it just would have been nice to have seen a little more concrete evidence, rather than offhand conjecture reported as fact.

    Karl Haudbourg
    Serbia’s Ambassador To The World
    http://www.ambassador-serbia.com

  • enrave

    Please visit any town or village in eastern Serbia populated with minorities (Magyars, Bulgarians, Slovaks) and have a long conversation with the troubles these people are facing in their daily lives.

    If you are a non-Serb living in Serbia your chances for finding a job or living some decent life are NONE. The constant rude behavior by any government institution or just about anywhere make it clear that there is no place for someone with a ‘weird sounding’ surname in Serbia.

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