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Nicaragua: Twittnic and the Expanding Blogosphere

The twitter hype came to Nicaragua, and a community website soon emerged called Twittnic [es]. The website follows any twitter feed by anyone who lives or is from Nicaragua. The community was an idea of @jorgecerda and @ajulloa. The twitter use @penalba is also helping, but on a more “philosophical” level, and @gandulo was the one who skinned and developed the website using WordPress. The website is currently following 38 twitters.

New logo voted on and selected by community members.

Some new and interesting twitter accounts have also been created, for example @ajulloa took the iniative to combine the RSS feeds of local newspapers and web forums in order to turn them into Twitter Feeds: @elnuevodiario, @laprensa, and @bacanalnica; but only El Nuevo Diario was able to work because the RSS feeds of La Prensa and Bacanalnica were not compatible to twitter, and nobody knows the reason.

New (or emerging) blogs

Notas de una nica [es] (Notes from a Nica) is a blog by Yaozka Tijerino Canton. In it Yaozka writes about real life in Managua, politics, phony cinema directors, music, and using local currency.

Ha notado que cada vez que usted va a un restaurante, a una tienda e incluso a una farmacia los precios están en dolares?. Que curioso que si nos pagan bajo la moneda nacional; es decir, en Córdobas, todo lo paguemos en dolares.

Have you noticed that everytime you go into a restaurant, a store, or even a pharmacy that the prices are expressed in dollars? It is interesting that we are paid in the national currency, Córdobas, but we pay everything with dollars.

¿Y ahora de que vamos a hablar? [es] (¿And what are we going to talk about?) is a blog by Naren Mayorga. It covers political matters, music from the 1980s, “freaky” subcultures, e-commerce and phising in local banks, Paul McCartney's old songs, and firsthand reporting about the latest transport strike

Andando por las calles de managua no he visto nada fuera de lo comun, ni grandes filas de carros por algun tranque ni grandes grupos de gente esperando rutas que nunca pasan. Quizá es solo mi percepcion, pero creo que las protestas están a nivel externo de la capital. Ya ando la cámara en el carro por cualquier cosa que vea.. vamos a ver como se desenvuelve esto.

Passing through the streets of Managua, I did not see anything uncommon. There were neither long lines of cars due to a blockade, nor large groups waiting for routes that never seems to pass. Maybe it was my perception, but I think the protests were outside the capital. I have a camera in my car just in case I see something… let's see how this plays out.

1 comment

  • […] ENGLISH: The twitter hype came to Nicaragua, and a community website soon emerged called Twittnic [es]. The website follows any twitter feed by anyone who lives or is from Nicaragua. The community was an idea of @jorgecerda and @ajulloa. The twitter use @penalba is also helping, but on a more “philosophical” level, and @gandulo was the one who skinned and developed the website using WordPress. The website is currently following 38 twitters. […]

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