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Egypt: Praying against Mubarak in the Metro

Wahda Masrya, was in a metro when she accidentally passed by a situation she felt a need to describe.. and here she goes:

كنت في المترو عندما دخلت إمراة شابة تحمل طفلا تتدلى رأسه للخلف فاقدا للوعي , عرضت عليها إحدى السيدات ان تجلس من اجل طفلها فردت عليها الأم الشابة “مبقتش تفرق ما هو ميت ميت من الكيماوي اللي بيأخدو كل يوم”تلك الكلمات أصابت كل الواقفات بالصدمة و بدأت الأسئلة تنهال على الأم الذي يعاني إبنها من ورم خبيث في المخ و هو عمرة لا يتجاوز الست سنوات و يتلقى علاجا كيماويا و يحتاج لنقل الدم و تعاني الأم لإيجاد كيس الدم لأن إبنها فصيلته نادرة و بعد قليل بدأت النصائح للام بالذهاب إلى مستشفى 57357 لتقيد إسم إبنها و ردت الأم بأنها فعلت ذلك و فعلت كل شيء من أجل إنقاذ حياة طفلها ….و أن كيس الدم هو الأساس الآن لحياة طفلها و هي بخلاف عدم وجوده فإنه يكلفها 85 جنية في المرة و هو ما لا تملكة و هنا صاحت إحدى السيدات بالدعاء على مبارك و زوجتة و أولادة جمال و علاء و عيالهم في تلقائية شديدة و وافقتها نساء المترو و تحولت عربة المترو إلى مظاهرة إحتجاجية ضد الحاكم و أولادة و أصحابة الذين خربوا مصر و جعلوا الفقر و المرض ينهش الأطفال و الكبار
و يا ويل اللي يمرض فيكي يا مصر

I was in the metro when a young woman got on the carriage, carrying a child over her shoulders. So another women offered her a seat to sit and have the child to rest, but the first woman replied “it doesn’t matter, my child is dead either way because of all the chemicals he takes everyday”.
These words shocked all people standing in the metro, and questions were directed to the mother whose child suffers a tumor in the brain. He is no more than six years and undergoes chemical therapy which needs constant blood transfer, while the mother can not find such blood bags easily as her son’s blood type is very rare.
After a while, people advised her to go to 57357 Hospital [1], but she replied that she already did everything she could for saving her child’s life.. however she can’t easily find the blood bags, which is the most essential element in his case. Each bag costs her 85 pounds, such amount of money that she doesn’t have. Spontaneously, another woman in the metro prayed loudly against Mubarak, his wife and children, Gamal and Alaa, as well as their children. Soon all the other women joined her, and the metro turned into a protest against the president, his sons and his friends who ruined Egypt and let poverty and diseases kill everybody – young and old.

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[1] 57357 Hospital, is a national charitable hospital built for curing children who suffer tumors or cancer. And the reason why it's called 57357, is because that is the bank account opened in almost all Egyptian banks to accept funds from people to continue the project's construction.

1 comment

  • sherif sharaf

    very very biased . dont forget how many campaigns Mubaraks wife initiated to try and educate the likes of the metro people against getting 8 children!!
    you egyptians are pathateic . its always the governments fault isint it?

    hes the bad one. hes the one who raised the price of gass. how could they?
    and cigaretts. and al the population does is cry and moan like neswan.

    begad entoo sha3b A7A!!

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