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Egypt: The Cairo Social Circus

After last week's “is Mubarak Dead Scare/Celebration” that swept the Egyptian blogosphere things have gone back to normal with the usual mélange of social issues, some of them a result of the scare/controversy itself.

It's often too easy to convince Egyptians of some conspiracy or gossip but equally impossible to convince them it's not true. Zeinobia recounts Egyptians skepticism on the Mubarak issue.

The Egyptian people are still disbelieving that Mubarak is fine , ok they know that he is alive and in Egypt but they do not believe that he is fine easily

On Saturday , Dream TV II popular TV Show “10 PM” discussed these rumors concerning the president's health and life , how the people received it with great worry and the reason behind the spread of these rumors and the ultimate question who spread them – they were speaking as they are rumors not a reality

As the rumors of his death have been swirling, Mubarak's wife Suzan has been pandering for peace, much to the dismay of Egyptians. To preach peace in a country where your husband persecutes religious minorities and opposing voices is hypocrisy in motion, they said. The crew at Free Kareem.org have the rest of the story.

Suzan Mubarak, Egypt’s first lady and core member/sponsor of the Women’s International Peace Movement, shares her insight with the young and diverse delegates:

“Peace is not a far-fetched idea. Youth is the most solid resource base,” Mubarak said in her opening speech. “Listening is a great start, but acting upon what you hear is more important.”

Unfortunately, acting upon what he heard is precisely what Kareem did, and he is facing prison time for it. We believe that with Kareem still in prison many youth writers, human rights activists, and even just mere students interested in free speech will take this message as a threat. Kareem is an example of a grand error which we hope to see corrected by the Egyptian government.

Societal issues facing Egyptians who live in the belly of the beast itself have out reaching hands that touch Egyptians all over the diaspora. Arima at Ha Ana Za is questioning the issue of class.

“If you work hard enough, you can get anywhere” I was told. To some extent that is true, I doubt that my forefathers would ever have believed it possible that their offspring would one day be living in the UK and studying at Oxford but then circumstances change with time and I have always said that I owe my mere existence to Nasser's revolution.

However, looking at a friend's engagement photos I was distinctly reminded that there is still such a thing as class. While I inspected her dress, and the lavish party and many guests, it dawned on me that as a ‘westerner’ one is allowed to transcend some divisions in the Arab social system. Living here means that one mixes freely with anyone who happens to call themselves ‘Arab’ and the massive differences in currency mean that places that would ordinarily be inaccessible to anyone other than the privileged classes, hold their doors open.

Most people raised outside of the Middle Eastern culture may be surprised to know that stereotypes and national rivalries are common place in the so called “Arab World”. Everyone dislikes everyone else and the only thing they have in common is that they share 20 something common enemies. It's a big barrel of hateful fun! These rivalries are cultivated in the home and broadcasted in national newspapers, the most recent being a Kuwaiti article. Ahmad Ghareeb has the rest

Kuwaiti journalist Fouad Al-Hashim wrote an article published on Al-Watan newspaper attacking the Egyptian nation using sever derogatory terms!
“The Kuwaiti journalist described the Egyptians as “priced equally to a Korean washing machine”!

Ramadan is around the corner. For some preparation is a little more than gathering groceries for the month. Moon Light Shadow gives his personal opinion

Ramadan is knocking on the doors, and all are getting ready.. each in his own way..

Government is making sure that all kinds of food are available.. People are buying Ramadan yameesh (dried fruits and nuts).. children getting their fawanees (lanterns).. T.V. channels are getting ready with their shows and ads.. charity channels are getting ready preparing shonat Ramadan.. people are collecting money for mwa2d el ra7man.. mosques are getting decorated and prepared for tarawee7 prayers.. and this list goes on..

I wonder, where am I from all this?!
I remember myself years ago.. how I used to have plans and a will to carry them out, though I never fulfilled these plans fully, but at least I had the plans.. I had it in mind..

Things have been different for couple of years.. the gap is increasing, and I'm doing nothing about it.. I'm just watching.. at times it's really painful.. other times I try to let it go.. but I can't stand myself anymore.. a step should be taken.. however, whenever I just think of trying, I find something increasing the gap.. day by day my will is fading..

Well that just about covers it. As usual catch me here every week.

1 comment

  • Thanks D.B. Great round up and wonderful writing as usual. Thanks for linking me :-)

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