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Bahrain: Illegitimate Children

Bahraini blogger Lizardo is on an on-the-job training stint – which he has to complete to earn his university degree. In this translation, he tells us some of the hard lessons in life he had to learn as an added bonus.

حالياً قاعد آخذ كورس التدريب العملي المطلوب للتخرج …. اشتغل الحين في ادارة أموال القاصرين-وزارة العدل في قسم الهندسة
مو هذا موضوعنا ، الموضوع هو انه لما تشتغل في مكان مماثل تشوف العجايب وتروح من بالك كل افكارك القديمة عن طيبة الناس و عدالتهم تجاه غيرهم
I am currently completing my on-the-job training course, which is a requirement for my graduation. I work at the Department of Managing Minor's Funds at the Justice Ministry, in the Engineering section. This isn't our topic. Our issue is that when you work in a place like this, you see wonders and all your preconceived ideas about the kindness of people and their justice towards others disappear.
تشوف اخوة يضربون خواتهم اعلى حساب مبلغ لا يزيد طوله عن الاربع ارقام … يضربونهم قدام كل الناس وفي نص الوزارة . من جم يوم جا واحد صغير وتكلم ويا احد الموظفين يقوله ان احد المحامين اتصل له وخبره ان المبلغ اللي قالوا له انه بيورثه طلع بالغلط وهوه ماله شي
سأله الموظف : قالك السبب ؟ قال اي وهو منزل راسه …. رفع راسه وهو بيصيح وقال : لأني ولد غير شرعي
You see brothers hitting their sisters for a four digit figure. They beat them up in front of all the other people, in the middle of the ministry. A few days ago a young man came to the ministry and spoke to one of the employees. He told him that a lawyer had called him telling him that he would not inherit anything from his father's will. The employee asked him: Did they tell you what the reason was? The man replied, with his head hanging down: Yes. He then raised his head and yelled saying: Because I am an illegitimate son.
الولد جابته امه عقب ثلاث شهور من زواجها من ابوه طبعاً امه مو الاولى وعنده اخوة من مرت ابوه اكبر منه بسنوات …. الاخوان طردوا الولد من البيت … اكيد مايبون اخوهم النغل يقعد وياهم … فموت ابوه خلاه يتيم و مفلس و بلا عائلة ومنبوذ من المجتمع …. طبعاً مايحصل هالولد جنسية لأنهم خلاص عرفوا من وين يحصلون النغول اللي مابتقول ليهم لا
The boy was born three months after his mother married his father. Of course, his mother wasn't the first wife and he had older brothers from his father's first wife, who were older than him. The brothers threw the boy from the house. They of course don't want a bastard to live with them. The death of his father has left him orphaned, bankrupt, without family and despised by society. Of course, this boy will never get the Bahraini citizenship because (the government) has found where to get the bastards who would not say no to them.
هل هذا هو الشرع ؟؟ اذا اي … شالذنب اللي اقترفه عشان يصير له جدي ؟ ادري ان اللي سواه ابوه غلط بس ليش الولد قاعد يتحمل الخطأ ؟ شدخل الجنسية في الموضوع ؟ يمكن ماجا بطريقة شرعية بس الولد جا من نفس المكان اللي اخوانه جوا منه يعني ابوه معروف.
احد يقدر يشرح ليي اشلون من الممكن اللي يصير هوه العدل؟
Is this the law? If yes.. what is the crime he has committed to suffer this fate? I know that what his father has done is wrong but why is this young boy shouldering that mistake? What has the nationality got to do with this issue? He may not be a legitimate child but this boy came from the same place as his other brothers have come from, and his father is known. Can someone explain to me how what is happening now is justice?

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