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Across the Panamanian Blogosphere

#1: From Panama Guide, What to do with Noriega :

The other big story that will be continuing until at least September 9th is the pending release of Manuel Noriega from a prison cell in Miami where he has been held for the past 17 years on drug trafficking charges. France has asked for Noriega to be extradited there to serve time on a money laundering conviction, and Panama has (officially, anyway) asked to have him returned to Panama to do time for three convictions. The US has indicated that they intend to send Noriega to France (whew) but his case will go before a judge in the US who will rule on Noriega's request to be returned to Panama. Read more

#2: From Panama's Noriegaville News, Panama starts Jihad on teenage girls:

Teenage girls who don't behave according to PRD Sharia standards will be persecuted and denied their right to education. The policy is aimed at pregnant schoolgirls and those who otherwise walk out of line, for example by living together with a partner without being properly married. Read the complete article

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Photo credits: BoqueteGuide.com

#3: From Boquete Guide, visit the Mercado Municipal (Municipal Market) in the city of David in the Chiriqui province, one of the most popular places for foreigners to retire in Panama.

This province, Chiriqui is known as the food basket of Panama.
Vegetables, fruit, meat and dairy for much of the country comes form here. That means if you live here and buy fresh food they are really fresh, really good and unlike what we were acustomed to in the US.

Instead of selecting for long shelf life, color and transportability the selection here tastes like it has been a selection for just that, taste.

#4: From Rob-Rivera.com, Camping in Chicá, Campana :

Not as far but just as interesting as El Valle, Chicá in the Campana region of the interior is a great way to escape the city whether you’re in the mood to relax, do something fun or live out an RPG campaign. I went with some friends in order to congregate in the spirit of a grandiose camping adventure and what I got was a very welcome change of pace from the diatribe of the city.

Being the improvisational kind of cat, a good look at the trunk of my car carries everything one would possibly need for a wilderness adventure in Panama, no matter what your handicap setting is. Take notes, kids: Read the complete article

#5: From Panama's Noriegaville News: Canal Board Appointments Revive Shady Past .

The appointment of two new members of the board of directors of the Panama Canal has generated political controversy as opposition leaders claim that president Martin Torrijos’ selection of candidates is based on political favoritism rather than selecting the best persons for the job.

A closer look at both new candidates reveals that banking interests as well as a history of corrupt financial mismanagement are appointed into the Canal board by the PRD government. Read more

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#6: The Cooking Diva reports! From the Tropics: Tree Tomato Salsa – Salsa de Tomate de Arbol

I was first introduced to this unique and colorful fruit in one of my trips to Ecuador a few years back. There, this fruit is very well loved, consumed almost in a daily basis when it's in season. In Quito I tried it as a very refreshing fruit juice offered by friends or at restaurants and in a very intriguing looking hot sauce at a seafood restaurant. I say intriguing just because it was a sassy sauce!

All About The Sassy Fruit

It was LOVE at first sight. My senses indentifyed a delicate ripe mango aroma packed in a tomato skin with the soul of a passion fruit and the sexy red of pomegranate juice dancing around the seeds. Far from trying to confuse you, I am reinventing this fruit which I suspect is unknown or underestimated by many. When was the last time you had a Tree Tomato? Hmm, right…That is exactly what I thought! LOL. You haven't had the pleassure of trying it at least once, YET! Continue reading...

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Photo Credits: Matt Landau, The Panama Report

#7: From The Panama Report: Moving and Shaking in the Pearl Islands .

…Soon enough, we caught some beautiful 60-lb bonito tunas which in reality more looked like a collection of footballs. Keenan landed a stunning yellow and green Dorado which, once it experienced rigor mortis, he then used like a paddle to smack Sam in the back of the head.

At one point we intercepted a large flock of dolphins and they surfed alongside the boat, jumping and swerving and being gay. One of them had a white spot on his chest and I called him Lassie! Simultaneously, the first mate on the boat couldn't remember Keenan's name and referred to him as Quizno.

The islands themselves are glorious. Caves, secluded beaches, coral reefs. There's this amazing contrast of blue water, white sand, and deep green forest that inspired me to take out my easel and watercolors and paint until my hand got tired. That is, until I realized I don't own an easel or watercolors. I don't even know why they call it easel anyways as that reminds me of a small animal. Read the complete report...

#8: From Chiriqui Chatter: Should You Carry Medicare Part B in Panama?

First let me say that I understand that Medicare is worthless in Panama. This is one of the downsides of moving to Panama. While you may have worked your entire life in the US and religiously paid all of your taxes, you will not be able to collect a penny from Medicare unless you are in the US.

That being said the US puts the squeeze on you by telling you that your premium for Part B will go up each year at a rate of 10% a month for each year you postpone taking it. The current premium which went into effect January 2007 is $93.50 if your annual was $80,000 or less.
In 2005 the cost was $78.20. The current rate of $93.50 will translate to $112.20 with a two year delay. Read more

1 comment

  • First let me say that I understand that Medicare is worthless in Panama. This is one of the downsides of moving to Panama. While you may have worked your entire life in the US and religiously paid all of your taxes, you will not be able to collect a penny from Medicare unless you are in the US.

    http://www.sysexeuctive.com

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