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Touring Libyan blogs: women at the realm, promoting blogging, missed calls and other annoyances

It is no secret that Libyan females are doing better than their male counterparts in the education system in Libya. This is because they know it is the number one way to achieve financial independence and also greater personal freedom. This trend has been evident since the late 60s when more women have been encouraged to go to schools and especially since education is free in Libya up to university. Mens’ participation has been on the decrease as they are looking for means to make quick money. On the other hand, many of the men have chosen to go to the Economy Faculty ( kuliyat al iktisad ) in the hope that this would make them successful businessmen and land some kind of job in that sector.

Anyway this situation has been brought out by Libyan blogger Brave Heart who likened it to an ‘invasion’ after he has seen the results of highschool graduates in Libya. Apparently the top 43 graduates are girls. ” this mean more than 90% of the future leader will be women [sic] “. This thought was enough to send him into speculating whether one day there would be a Libyan woman for the top job. However, after acknowledging the success of the Libyan woman, he frankly thinks that the only place where she should be a ‘manager’ is at home, therefore prompting a lively debate.

“for me i can accept a woman as manger in house for peace purpose, but defiantly i wont accept her as my manger in my job. [sic]”

Have you ever attended a presentation about blogging? I have not – but I was pleasantly surprised to see that A.Adam was asked to draft one for the students of the Higher Institute of Electronics in Tripoli. This Institute has shown great vision in wanting to make the young people aware of this tool for expressing themselves. Truly whoever suggested this is an innovator.

“Two minutes later he presented me to his students, 10 (girls and boys) I started my lecture on Blogging, talking about The History and popularity, the technique, how we can use a web Blog for expressing our ideas. I must admit I was a little bit shocked because when I asked if anyone have any idea about this subject before, answer: no one know anything about blogging. Any way I showed them how to start their own blog and they promise me to increase the number of Libyans blogger soon. So now I’m waiting…[sic]”

A.Akram should perhaps offer to make this presentation at various schools even primary ones as it can help students in improving their writing and language skills. Bravo to another Libyan blogger.

Since the Libyana mobile provider has broken the monopoly of the El Madar along with its prices making the sim card increasingly accessible to all Libyans, the cell phone has become an
comment object. This social phenomenon is more of a fashion fad and must have item then a reflection of a need. It is more used to show off or sometimes for clandestine dating. Therefore, not everyone with a mobile can actually afford the ensuing expenses. Some people also carry a Libyana AND a Madar.

A negative aspect of this boom in communication is the ‘missed call’ syndrome captured beautifully by Hibo in her post in Arabic “Daily things that happen to me”.

“توا مش شيء يحرق الدم وحده مدايره لولدها الي كيف خش سنة أولي ابتدائي موبايل وتعبيله فيه كل شهر 10 د.ل
واتقولي ماعنديش رصيد باش نكلمك”

Translation: Is not something that would make your blood pressure go up, she has given her son who is in grade one a mobile and tops it up with ten dinars monthly, and then she says she does not have enough to ring me ?

“أصلا من يوم بطلت نعاود لحد يرنلي سلامتكم الموبايل معادش يرن اصلا “

Translation: The day I stopped calling them back [after they leave a missed call] my phone stopped ringing.

For Arabic readers you will enjoy Hibo's other comic/ nerve racking situations especially in the Libyan lingo. The commenters of course all agreed with her.

1 comment

  • i Remember my old Blog by your Last Comments about my way of talking by our Libyan languish .
    i miss that old days.

    best wishes
    Hibo

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