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Pakistan: Bloggers discuss the bomb blast in Islamabad

In Islamabad, a bomb blast triggered by a suicide bomber killed at least ten people at a rally in support of Pakistan's suspended chief judge. Following the tense time in Pakistan with the Lal Masjid issue as the Pakistani Army stormed the mosque, the country's bloggers have been closely watching the political developments. Metroblogging Islamabad had a post up within minutes of the blast –

… one is forced to wonder whether this is another in a long chain of violent reactions that people suspected may come to fore in the aftermath of the Lal Masjid incidents last week.

All Things Pakistan has photographs (warning: The images are from the bomb blast site.). While the post itself has little commentary, the comments discuss the blast and Musharraf's government.

The said suicide bombing has occurred right underneath where my office is in F-8 Markaz. The blast was so powerful that it has broken all the balcony side windows of my office and has literally cracked the plaster and the blew the wooden doors from its locked bolts! The blast was potent because the wave front was in between two buildings or plazas which had lead to the Islamabad Courts. So far 20 people are reported dead and equal number injured.

The comments go further to discuss if Musharraf is reason for such tragedies, as people may not be happy with his government, while others disagree with this stand. Another commenter points out why this isn't just a domestic political issue.

These folks are terrorists with no regard for the affairs of this world. They don’t have a purpose in mind; conflict itself is their purpose. There is an entire generation of brain-dead people who have been breeding in the border madrassahs for years; at first their modus operandi was armed conflict but given the perceived success of the tactics of their brethren in Iraq via suicide bombings, a bomb vest is their new weapon of choice. They have no demands except to be left alone to plan more conflict and to conquer the world for their faith.

The Pakistani Spectator writes about the common people of Pakistan, and the failure of the Government to protect them. The author points out that the only way out is to have people's representatives govern the country.

The Canvas talks of the pictures shown on the television from the site of the bomb blast, and suggests ways in which such violence could be curbed. The author says

In such circumstances the local police authorities should disallow people from holding public processions like these for a few days, as the chance of becoming a target of these suicidal terrorists is quite eminent. Thats common sense. The Chief Justice supporters should realize on their part that the country is undergoing a tumultuous period and facing a grave threat from the Waziristan region who have declared they will target prominent leaders and politicians with suicide bombers. For all that has been going on with the Lal Masjid, Islamabad is the last place to be found at.

Rockestani, who works in the media sector, talks of the state of media in the country and the four suicide attacks in the last one week. The author offers interesting insight into the attention that the Lal Masjid got in the international media.

The Red Mosque caught the world's attention primarily cos of scenes of Burka clad women wielding batons. Is the only way for your average women to gain power throuh radicalism. It seems to me that radicalism has empowered the women of a section of society here. It kinda makes sense doesnt it. When the position and status of most women here is so marginalised, suddenly they have been able to commander the attention of the gov't and authorities. Well wouldn't you?

The Mermaid Tavern shares memories of going to a particular video store she used to go to as a child. She talks about the sheer anxiousness she experienced as she called her grandparents who live close to the Markaz.

Who did this and why? What drives a person to be willing to take human lives in order to achieve a political objective? What kind of statement needs to be written with the blood of others? How can the sanctity of life mean nothing to these people? I can't understand it. I don't want to understand it.

Not here. Not in my hometown.

I wonder how many people in how many towns of the world have whispered those words..

MicroPakistan talks about the repercussions of the Musharraf's policies, and the callousness of television media as they aired footage from the site of the tragedy.

GEO, in its crude fashion, allowed the nation to experience and relive the horror again and again as the cameras ruthlessly rolled while bodies bathed in blood-and in some cases only upper torsos-trembled their last breaths.

Peace Like A River talks of the political complexities, Pakistan's cultural and regional diversity, party politics and the rise in suicide attacks in the country.

4 comments

  • We are glad our voices are being heard…! Thk you, Neha. ♥

    -Phil

  • Sahil

    Dear General Pervez Musharraf,

    The leader of a country is the one whom we could own, but in our country, it is the one “feared.” You tell the Americans to go for dialogue in Waziristan and Afghanistan but you kill your own mates within the country. You are under a “messiah” complex and are putting everything at stake. I, after years of opposition to the arguments of my friends have started to believe now that Pakistan may disintegrate under a General again. Even further, the Americans are pushing us towards internal conflicts, towards civil war. They propagate dialog in their own country but provide more arms to the Pakistan Army to kill their own countrymen.

    Additionally, the feeling I get when I enter any cantonment area in Pakistan makes me think that the civilians live in a different world. Yes, Mr. President (through a fake referendum!), flowers abound in the garrison areas, children play squash, tennis, swim in swimming pools, get educated in best schools and colleges, have clean environment and get best hospital treatment but the civilian-poor swim in rain water, play hide and seek with arms around them and fight with unemployment, costly education, zero health, no legal protection and negative law and order scenarios.

    You have created an even bigger divide among Pakistan Army and the people of Pakistan. Zia started it but now it is touching heights! We as children used to come out of our homes and salute any green army vehicle passing by. Now, we fear and keep our children away from the defenders of the nation.

    There is much more Mr. President but you need open eyes and ears, open heart and most of all, good aides to tell you the truth. You have been surrounded by incompetent and corrupt people from all sides (by the way, it was your choice in the first place to involve NAB and then get these crooks with you); accompanied with your stubbornness, this makes things worse for Pakistan. The losers are us, the common people of Pakistan; the winners – God knows!

  • The Green Army is no more defender they are extremist and killed anybody if the ransom paid to them

  • […] Pakistan und die Unruhen in dem Land geht es in dem neuen „Featured Article“ von Neha Viswanathan. Metroblogging Islamabad war der erste, der über einen Selbstmordattentäter in Islamabad […]

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