22 May 2007

Stories from 22 May 2007

Japan: Marriage and “Casual Infidelity”

  22 May 2007

Shari at My So-Called Japanese Life has a thoughtful piece on the way in which Japanese people, as compared to Americans, view marriage. She writes: “It's always been my impression that the Japanese set the bar “lower” when it comes to the romance part of marriage and “higher” when it...

South Africa: politician invited to create an iblog

  22 May 2007

The owner of iblog, Mark Garbers, invites the leader of Independe Democrats in South Africa to create an iblog: “Dear ibloggers, Although I don’t normally personally invite people to create an iblog, I thought that in light of the coverage that blogging is receiving, inviting Patricia De Lille to sign...

Sudan: If there were a transcript…

  22 May 2007

Ingrid at Sudan Watch on the Debate on Darfur: “Heh. Rock on Drima! Why no webcast? If there were a transcript, I'd mull over John Prendergast's commentary in the hope of getting some understanding of the rationale behind his warmongering stance on Sudan.”

Syria: Lebanese Ceasefire

“Fateh Al Islam has accepted a government offer of a ceasefire. They say they will stop attacks if the army does not attack them. The army has responded by saying they never fire first. Humanitarian organisations say it's vital to have a break in fighting to get food and water...

Kuwait: Lebanese are “Fed Up”

‘“We are fed up!!” That is what all Lebanese are saying these days. Past two days, I asked many lebanese people in Kuwait what they think of whats going on, all of them have given up any hope they had for our country to rebuild and all they want now...

Kuwait: Loose Lion

Lebanese blogger Mark reports that a lion is on the run in Kuwait and is being hunted by police. “I just heard there is a lion loose in Kuwait. It seems it escaped from a Sheikh's (member of the Ruling Family) residence in the Fintas area and now the cops...

Lebanon: Fighting Toll

As fighting in Lebanon continues between the Lebanese Army and Fateh el Islam, Tom Felle takes a look at the toll: “As witnesses said there are bodies strewn on the streets inside the camp, the body count from the deadliest fighting to hit Lebanon for two decades hit 80 yesterday....

Lebanon: Fighting Continues for Third Day

“Gunbattles erupted between Lebanese troops and Islamist militiamen around a Palestinian refugee camp today, the third day of fierce fighting that has killed dozens of people. Black plumes of smoke billowed into the sky as troops fired tank shells and artillery at positions of Fatah al-Islam, a shadowy Sunni militant...

Lebanon: Fighting Update

Lebanese blogger Abu Kais updates us on the latest fighting in Lebanon between the Lebanese Army and Fateh el Islam. “The Siniora government is waging this war with the support of the international community and the Arab League, which issued a statement supporting the army's operation. The ‘opposition’, meanwhile, continues...

Lebanon: Attrition War

“The situation is sliding into an attrition war. The broad support by all Lebanese and Palestinian faction, other than ‘Fateh al Islam’, to the army and its actions against those cold blood terrorist, has been eroding rapidly…” writes Bob from Lebanon. “I think that the window of opportunity, to decisively...

Libya: On Women's Attire

Writing from Tripoli, Libya, Iranian blogger Mrs Behi says: “Here in Libya I haven’t seen a couple walking in the street hand in hand. It seems to me as if taking this simple act of closeness feels very strange to them! And also you can rarely see any woman at...

D. R. Congo: Park Rangers Attacked, Flying over Katanga, Music meets Social Activism, and Ants 2 – Brian 0

  22 May 2007

Access to the Internet in the Democratic Republic of Congo is gradually improving (World Bank figures suggest there are already over 6 million users), but will remain prohibitively expensive as long as service providers are dependent on satellite connections. In such a context, it should come as no surprise that there are only a handful of Congolese bloggers. Chatrooms and instant messaging are very popular, however, and with the influence of the Diaspora, it’s easy to imagine that many more young Congolese people will soon be following the footsteps of pioneers like Cedric, perhaps blogging in Lingala, Luba, Kikongo and Swahili as well as French.

Iran:Why we need journals and Journalists?

Arash Hassannia writes[Fa] in Hanouz that journalism is very sick in Iran.The blogger adds a few ordinary employees in Supreme National Security Council can take decision about what journalists should not write in their journals.The blogger says writing about teachers’ and workers’ strikes has become an unforgivable sin.Arash adds even...

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