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Iran: Connecting the Medical World and Norouz Inspires Reflection

paris

Iranian bloggers provide information, share their opinions, and discuss various issues with their photography, illustrations, and text. But that's not all. Occasionally, they launch plans to make the world a better place. Paris Marashi, an Iranian-American video-blogger has revealed a project that aims to bring Iranian medical professionals in contact with their colleagues around the world.

Writing in the weblog Sounds Iranian Paris describes her project, Iran Medical Research Connect, as a community-building web portal that will connect medical professionals from Iran and from around the world.

She says the objective is to help medical educators, professionals, and researchers to share papers, learn about projects and events, and to connect Iranian and non-Iranian medical professionals around the world.

It is a user-test, which i developed because a number of doctors and researchers that I know in the medical field are working with Iran, and were interested in having a place to come together, connect, and exchange information and ideas. I want to see how different tools can facilitate cross-cultural exchange projects. You can read more about my thoughts as I update them in my thesis site.

Paris’ bridge making idea becomes all the more valuable as Iran's nuclear crisis causes its further isolation from the international community..

Suffering workers and Suspended economy

Iranians celebrated Norouz or New Year on the first day of Spring. Many bloggers used the turn of seasons to look back on the past year and discuss some of the difficulties, including consequences of nuclear crisis.

Kargar [Fa] (“Worker”) says that this year's Nourouz celebration, like previous years, is not a happy event for workers. The blogger adds workers are now under the worst pressures from the capitalist state and that their children are desperately awaiting gifts that are out of reach for most working-class parents. Kargar also reminds us that several teachers who demonstrated for a pay raise in March are still in prison. Looking forward, he adds that workers can expect a year where their daily life will be very difficult but that it will also bring a new chapter in their struggle for worker's rights.

Ali Mazroi [Fa],a reformist politician and former deputy in parliament, says that Iran's nuclear policy has suspened the country's economy.

If we look at the past year we can say it was a very hard year for the majority of Iranians. I say most of the Iranians because there is a minority who want nuclear energy at any price and for them it is even more important than daily life. Most of these people are in power and they do not need to care about their daily bread. They try to show that all Iranians support “nuclear energy as our inalienable right” and for this reason they repress any other request by Iranians.

He adds that the government failed to bring positive change to the daily lives of Iranians, especially the poor. He concludes that the only positive development from the past year came from the government-supported candidates in the local elections.

Jomhour [Fa] says that this year can be a year of peace and non-violence for Iranians. We can declare that we oppose all wars and try to live peacefully with other countries.

Nature Cries

Animal [Fa] adds his own analysis of the last year, arguing that the environment and nature were ignored by the government. According to the blogger, during Khatami‘s term, the environment was always the second or third priority of the government. At present, environmental policy has dropped to 15 or even 20 on Ahmadinejad‘s list of priorities.

The blogger says the destruction of natural parks and forests, pollution in big cities and rivers, and not paying enough attention to endangered animals are among the main problems facing Iran's environmental issues.

“The Iranian way of living”

Iranian testament, an editor and journalist, seeks for an explanation of Iranian contentment.

Congratulations everybody! It's New Year holiday here in Iran. Everyone is happy. The only problem is that no one knows why s/he should be happy!
The price of gas is going to be double next year and the economists predict a tough year for Iranians. On the other hand, the UN Security Council has decided (with the majority of votes) to increase the pressure of sanctions on Iran. The number of tourists to Iran has decreased because of insecurity (or the image of insecurity) in the region. The good news is still going on. The publishers have decided to ban the Tehran international book fair (which is regularly held in May) to show their protest against Ahmadinejad's cultural policy. The coming year will be full of political troubles, economical suffering and cultural difficulties. But why does no one care?…
That's the Iranian way of living! Sing not to listen. Laugh to hide your tears. Buy to forget your misfortune. That's the Iranian way. I should adapt myself to it if I want to survive.

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