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Touring Libyan Blogs

The discussion continues from last week again on AngloLibyan who has brought up the topic of the Libyan AIDS stricken children as an offshoot of the previous week’s discussion about the Libyan AIDS stricken children.
Anglo Libyan highlighted this time the double standards carried out and the possibility of miscarriage of justice from the Bulgarian side. This is exemplified by the case of Michael Shields.

“Michael is a young English man who in 2005 was accused by the Bulgarian authorities of the attempted murder of a Bulgarian man who received severe head injuries. Michael Sheilds who was only 18 at the time was asleep when this crime happened as witnesses confirmed yet the police arrested him at his hotel, charged him with the crime and was sentenced to 15 years in a Bulgarian prison, after the sentencing another English man, Graham Sankey admitted to committing this crime and announced that he was prepared to co-operate with the Bulgarians and that Michael Shields should be freed. Surprisingly the Bulgarians refused this confession and insisted that they have the guilty man.[sic]”

Basically don’t throw stones at others if your own door is made of glass.

A.Adam from Flying Birds is complaining on the other hand about the LTT service
which seems to be suffering from a lot of errors lately.

“Error 691: The computer you are dialing in to cannot establish a Dial-Up Networking connection. Check your password, and then try again. I tired my best check my username passwords all my tries were useless [sic]”.

Apparently there is a way to resume service after this message is displayed despite the general un-helpful reaction of the employee he contacted. Check his post and what the commenters said for more.

Maysoon has posted the photos from the excursions that her mother and aunt have arranged recently for their children to get to know Libya (Tripoli in this case).

“Mom has some other ideas for those who left Libya, lived abroad, and now returned and their parents are being too protective, she is planning something for them, and yah for girls only, boys do not seem to face these kinds of problems (will keep you posted for those who want to join).”

Click here to see her report.

Another very interesting topic which I noticed taking place in Libya and which I was glad blogger Libyano brought up is the ‘no plastic bags at bakeries campaign’.

“I was happy the other day when I was at the bakery near our house and I saw the new campaign against plastic bags took effect. It is held by the Environment General Authority and The Secretariat Of Health & Evironment aiming to stop using the plastic bags in the bakeries and replace them with paper bags or other alternatives. This will limit the carcinogenic effect of the plastic bags on the food especially the hot bread and will try to lower the number of plastic bags being used daily which are causing two environmental problems [sic]”

The readers were giving feedback on their various experiences at the bakeries and how some of them were still using the traditional Libyan ‘guffa’ or basket to buy bread.

Meanwhile, Highlander made a post about everyone’s favourite radio station in Libya, namely Allibya FM and the type of programs it broadcast, including a ‘dear aunt agony’ one. One particular hot topic drawing many respondents and callers and whose reply she was surprised to hear was relevant to a young man’s dilemma, i.e to listen to his parents and marry his brother’s widow or to marry his love?

Very touching and stay tuned (no pun intended :P) for some more Libyan bloggers and stories next week.

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