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Mali: Malian cuisine

Sociolingo's Mali blog has a post about Malian cuisine: “The main foods eaten by a moderately well-off family living in Mali’s capital, Bamako, are rice, millet, sorghum, and beans, cooked as a sort of porridge, served with a meat or fish sauce. A common meal in southern Mali is called tô, a pudding made from pounded millet, served with a sauce of meat or vegetables. In the North, the Songhay and Touareg make thick doughy pancakes served with wild leaves. Tô is also popular in Burkina Faso.”

2 comments

  • Rachel Black

    Hello!
    My class and I are studying snacks around the world, and I have two students who would like to find a snack typical in Mali. Can you help us out? We aren’t finding too many snacks; mostly meals. Any ideas? Thank you!

  • erica

    rachel,
    i found a kind of snack that is really good.
    it is called seseme seeds and honey sticks.
    i have attached the receipe for you if you would like to make it

    Sesame seed and honey sticks (Meni-meniyong)
    Remember to ask an adult to help you with this recipe.
    Ingredients:
    1 cup/100g sesame seeds
    50g margarine
    1 cup/350ml honey or 1 cup/175g sugar
    Method:
    1. Heat the sesame seeds in a shallow pan without any oil, until they begin to jump about and turn golden. Shake the pan so that they do not stick or burn. Allow to cool.
    2. Using a heavy pan, heat the margarine or oil and then add the sugar or honey. Stir continuously until the mixture begins to caramelise (which is when it turns slightly brown, but without burning).
    3. Pour the sesame seeds into the warm mixture and stir thoroughly.
    4. Transfer the mixture into a flat tin. As the mixture cools, shape it into sticks either by cutting or rolling, and then coating it with more sesame seeds if required.

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