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Jamaica: Saved by The Cure

In the summer of 1987, Jamaican writer Marlon James is saved by The Cure: “I don’t remember 1987 by any sequence of days and dates; I remember it by breaths I lost, gasping at “Just Like Heaven.” I can’t recall any major events but I do remember the sad drum clatter of “Like Cockatoos,” fighting against the thunder strings and the titanic, looping bass. . . . I remember that being the exact point when loving something everybody else hates became the greatest pleasure in the world. . .

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  • […] Jamaica: Saved by The Cure – In the summer of 1987, Jamaican writer Marlon James is saved by The Cure: “I don’t remember 1987 by any sequence of days and dates; I remember it by breaths I lost, gasping at “Just Like Heaven.” I can’t recall any major events but I do remember the sad drum clatter of “Like Cockatoos,” fighting […]Jamaica, Colombia: Identity etc – In response to some questions posed to him in December, Jamaican writer Geoffrey Philp writes an open letter recounting a visit to a Colombian restaurant in Florida with his (part-Colombian) family: “Of course, I’ve chosen to blog about it and this is one way about talking about your questions, which are really questions about identity.This […]Jamaica: Political advice from Lifehacker – B.art hacks an article from the personal productivity blog Lifehacker about ways to become politically involved to make it relevant to a Jamaican audience. Jamaica: Thoughts on MLK Day – Jamaican Leon Robinson presents his thoughts on Martin Luther King Day (observed on January 15th in the US): “Though Martin Luther King Day is an American celebration, I think blacks everywhere should celebrate it, as we are one race, and a victory for one is a victory for all.“ Jamaica: 30 years on, critique still holds water – The latest installment in Geoffrey Philp’s “In My Own Words” series, which focuses on Caribbean writers, is a critique of the Caribbean’s failure to give recognition to the arts written 30 years ago by Jamaican poet/playwright/screenwriter/journalist Olivier Stephenson. Geoffrey kicks off the comments with the words: “Although it’s sad that something you had written over […] […]

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