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Bangladesh: On the swastika

An ancient symbol appears to forever lose its meaning because of the Nazi connection. Inspirations and Creative Thoughts on the Swastika. “European Union is planning to ban the symbol of Swastika, infamously used by the Nazi. But hindus are opposing the move because despite its being adopted as symbol of Nazism, it is one of the most ancient and sacred symbol in Dharmic religion such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism.”

3 comments

  • Golam Haider Ali

    It is a good decision that European Union decided has been decided to ban the symbol “Swaetika’. The hindu’s although see it as a sacred symbol, but I still think the symbol should be banned as it can create inspiration for future generations to establish hate organisation, as we can see it in Viswa Hindu Parishad and Hindu organisation BJP in India have been trying to use Swastika to organize extreme right wing hindu’s against the muslims and other minorities in India.

  • It is a criminal act to ban the swastika just as it was a criminal act for the Nazi’s to pervert this good luck symbol. The swastika is a highly respect symbol in the east and among we Buddhists around the world. The Europeans should not reward Hitler or think that their limited experience and understanding should determine what the rest of the world thinks, believes or honors. This is also a racist act and stinks of religious intolerance.

    Venerable Kevin O’Neil
    American Buddhist Monk

  • Unfortunately, this sacred symbol was misused by the Nazi Regime, considering it an Aryan symbol and Hitler believing that the German people were the only pure surviving Aryans. There is no such thing as a pure race as, throughout history, people have intermarried. As this symbol appears on many shrines and Buddha images throughout Asia, it has great meaning to those of Asian background. Because of its misuse by the Nazi regime is insufficient reason to ban it, especially in Asian countries. However, in ‘Western’ countries, where Buddhism is growing rapidly, it should be used with caution. Many Jewish people living in ‘Western’ countries, seeing such symbols, could feel uncomfortable and reminding many of them of the horrors of the holocaust. Buddhists should be sensitive to the feelings of these people and not cause them further suffering. The teaching of the Buddha does not depend on symbols but on practice.

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