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Voices from South Asia

Bangladesh:

Asif of Unheard Voices: Drishtipat Group Blog analyzes the current political situation in Bangladesh and urges all the Bangladeshis to take a non-partisan moral stand to get out of the current crisis.

Andrew Morris writes an essay in Desicritics about the historical faces of Dhaka city titled Bangladesh Diary: Time travel.

Journalist Ahmede Hussain remembers Nur Hossain, who 19 years ago gave his live during a protest against the autocratic government paving away the road to democracy in Bangladesh. He writes with disgust that the persons who have become the beneficiaries of Hossain's sacrifice are now squabbling for autocratic power.

Bhutan:

Thingyel of the Kuzu-Bhutan weblog pays tribute to the King His Majesty Jigme Singye Wangchuck on his Birth Day on November 11 with a nice poem.

India:

GV Krishnan writes in Desicritics that a haircut of an Indian Cricket star can be a public affair.

Rama of Cuckoo's Call narrates how absolute power corrupts in the Indian State West Bengal.

Maldives:

Moyameehaa thinks that the Maldivian president Maumoon Abdul Gayyoom is a superstitious dictator.

Nepal:

Deepak Adhikari, a veteran Nepali journalist blogger provides some tips on how to improve one's writing skills.

Razib Ahmed writes in the South Asia Biz that poaching rhinos is a lucrative business in Nepal.

Pakistan:

Owais Mughal of All things Pakistan highlights four songs of Runa Laila, the famous Bangladeshi singer. She has a huge contribution of singing Urdu songs in Pakistani movies. She has also sung Punjabi, Pashto and Bengali songs in Pakistan. In fact, she has sung in 17 different languages of the world.

KO reviews Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf's autobiography ‘In the Line of Fire’.

Sri Lanka:

Sri Lanka Politics analyzes why politician Nadaraja Raviraj was killed in Colombo recently.

Tumeke! opines that the ongoing conflict in Sri Lanka between the security forces and the Tamil tigers is pushing the country to a humanitarian crisis.

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