Close

Support Global Voices

To stay independent, free, and sustainable, our community needs the help of friends and readers like you.

Donate now »

See all those languages up there? We translate Global Voices stories to make the world's citizen media available to everyone.

Learn more about Lingua Translation  »

Pana-Blogs Report

#1: Chiriqui Chatter on "Fatal Bus Fire Causes Identified"

Don Winner posted the resolution of the bus fire that killed 18 people. To net it out, it was a failure caused by negligent maintenance of the bus. In the US, the mechanic would be looking at serious legal problems. Read the complete post

#2: "Al Aire Libre" descibes what a "machete" is and how useful to carry it when exploring the jungle (ES):

El machete es una herramienta fundamental para las travesías por el bosque tropical. El fin de semana del 14 y 15 de octubre caminamos desde La Línea, justo antes de Nombre de Dios, hasta Boquerón Arriba. Es una travesía de 25 kilómetros que atravieza el Parque Nacional Chagres. Hay bastantes árboles caídos a lo largo del camino y se necesita tirar machete con frecuencia para cruzar las marañas que se forman cuando un árbol expone el suelo del bosque a la luz del sol. Yo generalmente saco mi machete en cuanto entro al dosel del bosque y no lo guardo hasta salir. Continuar leyendo

The "machete" is a very important tool used in trips to the tropical forest. During the weekend of October 14 y 15 we walked from "La Linea," just before Nombre de Dios, to Boqueron Arriba. It is a 25 kilometers trail which goes through the Parque Nacional de Chagres (Chagres National Park). There are many fallen trees along the train and that is when the machete becomes really handy to cut them off as well as other weeds and that grow after a fallen tree exposes the ground to the sun light. I normally carry my machete out since I step into the forest until we finish the walk. Continue reading

#3: Asi es la Vida en Panama brings up a very controversial issue on the way the problems are solved by the government in this country: "Con comentarios como estos" (ES) exposes the frustration of a great deal of Panamanians facing the deaths by intoxication which occurred after the Social Security distributed poisoned medication to its patients. Read the post in Spanish

#4: MsAbcMom shares a pictorial review and a video commemorating the Panama's Independence Day: November 3.

#5: Tatiana from Tatiana's Blog goes fishing to Lake Gatun in La Arenosa, La Chorrera. Do not miss the colorful photos and the video, they will make you pack your bags and visit Panama right away!

#6: Rob Rivera on "Panamanians and November"

It would seem that 103 years ago a group of socially-conscious Panamanians decided to rise up around the end of October and make November the month where most (if not all) of our most important battles for freedom took place… more than a hundred years later we, the people, enjoy these dates as excuses to go to the beach and get drunk on so many levels there should be a hospital wing where people can detox, frequent puker program included. The only real exception to the November rule would have to be August 15th, which is marked as being the day when the old city was founded in 1519 by one Pedro Arias de Ávila. It was the most important city in the continent due to its blooming business prospects and other wonderful things going for it until 150 or so years later when the place was raided and left in ruins by pirates… this, in many ways, would mark the fate of Panama as a whole: a place with a ton of potential, always blooming, until some savvy bastard comes in at just the right time and sweeps all of the
riches away for himself. Continue reading

Start the conversation

Authors, please log in »

Guidelines

  • All comments are reviewed by a moderator. Do not submit your comment more than once or it may be identified as spam.
  • Please treat others with respect. Comments containing hate speech, obscenity, and personal attacks will not be approved.