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Chile: The Day that Pinochet Dies

Publicist Roberto Arancibia is one of Chile's most popular bloggers. His affable tone and optimistic perspective are adept at parsing a variety of topics. Yet rarely does his blog, El Mundo Sigue Ahí (“The World's Still There”), delve into anything that would interest a political polemicist.

Last Wednesday, a few weeks before the 33rd anniversary of the coup that installed Pinochet as dictator, could therefore be viewed as an anomaly with the publication of “The Day that Pinochet Dies“:

A few days ago I read a post by Jorge Diaz (ES), which asked us what we were going to do the day that Pinochet died.

Just as I wrote in the comments, on September 11, 1973 I was 16 years old, studied philosophy at the University of Chile and I was the owner of the world. I was on forced vacation from university and had visited Chiloé as a guest of Papo, – what will come of him? – along with 4 companions from school. That morning, his mother woke us up to a large battery-powered radio, at full volume, which took over where we had slept. Get up, there is a coup in Santiago!? Of course, the news immediately replaced what had been our dreams and cured our slugishness from the previous day's curanto. Just like our dreams that Tuesday morning, many dreams were cut short that day, all over the country.

1 comment

  • While I realise that killing people as Pinochet and Castro etc have done to shore up their position when taking power in their respective coups as they are alledged to have done, do you think Chile is a better country today as a result of the economic policies the Pinochet regime installed?
    Just compare Cuba to Chile today would be my answer.
    What’s yours?

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