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Global Food Blog Report #28

#1: From Tanzania, MiRecipe.com spices up the day with an incredible easy and delicious recipe to prepare "Chatini Ya Ukwaju" (Tamarind Chutney). It is great with bread, and a tasty addition to your salad, fish or chicken dishes. Recipe in EN and Swahili. Get the recipe now!

#2: From Germany, Happy Burp on "Bottle Gourd Peels Chutney"

One of the themes doing the rounds of food-blogosphere these days is ‘Chutneys’. One of the main ingredients of it being peels of vegetables. I have blogged about one such chutney already. Here's another one. But it's not just another chutney, you know. It is not just eco-friendly but also very very tasty. Because it is made with peels of bottle gourd (Doodhi/Lauki). Read more…

#3: From Singapore, Lenmiscates are Forever does "Assam Prawns – my first try without a  recipe"

My first try at assam prawns.  I’m OK with it but not wowed away by assam prawns but since I had tamarind lying around at home to I thought I’d give it a crack. I made it without a recipe so it probably is not real assam prawns (for example, later, I found out it needs candlenuts which I did not add). Anyway, after a bit of troubleshooting it turned out quite ok actually. Above is the tamarind packet I used to make the assam. Basically, add water and strain. Follow the step by step recipe with photographs and enjoy this delicious dish!

#4: Evil Jungle Prince, presents a bounty of exotic, ethnic recipes. Some of my favorites:

If you can can get your hands on a green papaya, you can easily prepare it too. If you have a Filipino or Thai grocery nearby, they are sure to have them. (Actually I can hardly believe that I have access to them myself — who knows where they are trucked in from?) And if you're interested in making this dish into a full meal, just add some chilled shrimp and peanuts on top. This dish is called som tum in Thai, and tam som in Laotion. Get the recipe now!

#5: Malaysia Best brings some great news on the health benefits of eating green and yellow vegetables, and a delicious recipe to prepare "Snow Peas and Yellows Capsicum Stir Fry"

Scientists have found brightly coloured yellow and green vegetables
contain chemicals that can help protect the eyes against damage that occurs in later life. Women under 75 who ate lots of vegetables such as peas, broccoli, squash and sweetcorn had lower rates of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

What a co-incident. I just made a yellow and green stir fry today and the above news appeared on DailyMail. Hmm…do chomp down more greens and yellow vegetables if you wish to live to 80 years and beyond with bright eyes. Read more and get this tasty recipe!

#6: From Guatemala (ES), "Blog de mi Guatemala" give us the scoop on where to get delicious looking, traditionally tasty food from Guatemala: Mission Street in San Francisco, California.

Panaderia La Universal (Bakery) has it all. From tamales to every kind of bread that holds the secret recipe,…just like the one you can get in Guatemala. From Guatemala even has a map to help you get to this bakery, AND also has some insight about "Tical," a very peculiar bar. Read more about "Tiendas Chapinas en los Estados Unidos."

#7: From northern Zimbabwe, Field to Feast shares her stories and travels in Africa. The latest: Tiger Fish: From River to Plate, is just so adventurous and tastily inviting!

My husband, Mark, eats no beef, chicken or pork and has spent years saving (rather than squishing) spiders, flies and sundry insects by carefully escorting them from inside the house to outside the house. This past weekend, he lost all this positive karma in a two-hour span of fishing on the Zambezi Mana Pools National Park in northern Zimbabwe. It was worth it….Continue reading!

8: From Eritrea, Blog.hakote.com cooks up the burger, the bun and the secret sauce with plentiful "Eritrean" spices:

Now the sauce is incredibly simple. I call it Eritrean ketchup because it includes my favorite combination of Eritrean spices, berbere.
It is a very simple sauce to make and all you have to do is combine things you likely already have in your refrigerator and pantry.

The recipe is simple, but should be done in two steps to make sure everything is properly integrated. First I would start with the lemon
juice and hot sauce (use your favorite brand)…Read more!

#9: From Canada, An Endless Banquet on organic produce from Jean-Talon Market:

A year and a half ago I found myself worried about the direction Jean-Talon Market was taking with its renovations. Quebec is riddled with places where modern improvements (even when they're intended to maintain a link with the past) spell the end of character, the end of charm, and I could easily see the market going that direction. When the new pavilion actually introduced some true vision into the fold (Olives et Épices, for instance)…

Anyway, by the time we got home from the market, and taking into account our trip to Windmill Point the day before, we were inundated in
good, fresh tomatoes. We've had them straight-up, we've had them in salads, we've had them on bagels with cream cheese, and we've made
pasta dishes with them… Here's one we made the other night. The anchovies are the dish's secret ingredient, adding unexpected depth. Continue reading a get the simply delicious recipe!

Happy Cooking!

1 comment

  • […] Food Blog Report #28 Food Blog Report #28 #1: From Tanzania, MiRecipe.com spices up the day with an incredible easy and delicious recipe to prepare "Chatini Ya Ukwaju" (Tamarind Chutney). It is great with bread, and a tasty addition to your salad, fish or chicken dishes. Recipe in EN and Swa[…] […]

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