Myanmar's Week of Terror

Moe Moe wants to remind people that this week is an important week in Myanmar's history.

Today is August 8th and I wanted to write a post about the injustice that happened to Burmese people on August 8th, 1988 (8-8-88).

On that particular day, the Burmese army killed hundreds of unarmed protestors who were demanding greater democracy, The next couple of days saw more violence.

The blogger links to an excerpt from Burmawatch.org

Soldiers pointed their automatic rifles in the crowds. Then, suddenly, the two warning pistol shots came and within seconds the automatic rifle shots took the center stage and scores of people, young and old fell to their death instantly. The streets near the City Hall turned chaotic with people screaming, running and taking cover in random directions.

Hostpitals were filled with the dead and the injured. Blood supplies were running dry. The situation was so desperate that doctors and nurses took out a procession requesting the soldiers to stop shooting.

One of the comments on the post says

I think the Burmese people may never be free from the military dictatorship in this lifetime. We should wise up and realise that hopes and dreams do not always come true if the Burmese continue to be a fragmented people. Truth is that many Burmese still live in extreme poverty with no hopes of change whereas a selected elite live out their *dreams* amidst the oppression of their own people by being indifferent.

The blogger responds

Life will always be a struggle, so we cannot give up, no matter what we do. If what we are hoping for is particularly difficult and hard to get, I think we each can do little things to bring about change. I try to often blog about the horrid things going on in Burma, to remind me, my friends, and also people who have never known this. My way of doing the small things and alot of political activists doing these small things – will they just be a drop in the lake? Probably but alot of drops can fill the lake or dry it, whichever way it goes.

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