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The Syrian Blogsphere, Away from Politics

This week, we'll keep dirty Middle East politics away for a change. And focus more social side of the Syrian blogsphere.

To start off with artsy Soraya, talking about the Jazz Festival that was held in the old city of Damascus this month, with live bands performing in the newly restored Citadel of Damascus, and deep inside the alleys of Old Damascus.

the Swiss Syrian Jazz orchestra is considered to be the only one in the Middle east And its music is wrote and composed by many well known composers all over the world Like Frank Kalberg (Finland) Amadis Duncal and Oliver Verdle (Switzerland), and Allen Johnson (US). The Jazz Orchestra( The big band) consists of 42 musicians divided between Syrians and Swiss members.

Abu Kareem has a good review of one of the most important books on Syrian History, Steel and Silk…

Sami Moubayed's 623 page opus is subtitled: Men and women who shaped Syria 1900-2000. This book contains short biographies of 341 Syrians whom Moubayed feels have had the largest impact -good or bad- on the history of the nation. He profiles personalities from all facets of public life including politicians, military officers, administrators, educators, and literary figures.

Abu Fares, shares a beautiful one hour journey from his hometown in Tartous to al-Sawda, with magnificent scenery.

If I had one free hour on my hand and if the weather was suitable to ride, a possible itinerary is to leave Tartous from the north and head toward Al-Sawda, 12 km to the northeast. I ride by the Free Zone and continue straight on the old Tartous-Lattakia road. 3 km out, I reach a railroad crossing and a bridge over Nahr Al-Hsein (نهر الحصين).

On to a more serious issue, Brian Anthony, speaks of how Israel fights Terror with Terror, from a British living in Damascus point of view…

“Don't go anywhere near Yarmouk,” my colleague warned, shaking her finger.
“Why?” I asked, wondering what was going on in the Palestinian refugee camp outside town. I had heard there were demonstrations there a couple days ago.

Finally, we'll close off with Omar‘s interesting pour of thoughts, namely, Deconstructed Thoughts…

there should be a rule against people who suddenly develop interest in international politics.. you shouldn't be allwoed to discuss current affairs until you watch at least 180 hours of international news.. (i.e. don't watch new breaks in between two episodes of “law and order” and “CSI Miami” and then come talk about the threat of international terrorism.

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