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This Week In Palestinian Blogs: Fire Dancing

The shelling of a Gaza beach few days ago which resulted in several deaths, continues to be a priority story for Palestinian bloggers this week; specifically the unresolved issue of responsibility.

While Kabobfest takes a look at the findings, Moi from My Occupation thinks this may be another Israeli cover-up but wouldn’t be surprised if those responsible get away with it. Amal Amireh quotes a Times article detailing an admission by the Israeli army that their initial report was “flawed”.

Meanwhile, Umkhalil looks at the international media’s approach to the story and the spin that ensued.

“Predictably the US media fails to recognize the deaths of Palestinian children as the report that the IOF didn't do it from the folks who wreaked havoc in “the land without a people for a people without a land” headlines google news and yahoo main pages.”

Dalia is shocked at all the recent internal fighting between Hamas and Fatah, reprimanding both parties in a post where she says with frustration:

“…and who ends up winning? NO ONE!!! The people here are hungry PA employees have not received their salaries in 4 months, the economy is going down the drain and Fatah and Hamas are fighting with each other”


Laila El-Haddad is in Connecticut continuing her speaking tour but is still finding it:

“…difficult to really talk about anything in light of the ongoing tragedies back home…Gaza is on the brink of implosion, and I'm not sure how much more it can take.”

In other news, Palestinian children continue to be harassed on their way to school. “What if it were Palestinians harassing Israeli children on their way to school?”, asks Haitham Sabbah.

Elsewhere, President Abbas has apparently been taking fashion tips from blogger Al-Falasteenyia, who donned a similar graduation gown only a month earlier. While in another interesting post she explores the scientific nature of “Zionist claims that Palestine is exclusively Jewish and that Jews are biologically connected to the land.”

Katie Miranda of Postcards From Palestine tried to break the menacing tension of Hebron that she often describes on her blog, by putting on a little poi performance complete with fire chains in the company of an enthusiastic neighbourhood audience.

Lucy Widaad (aka Palestinian Princess) is living it up in NYC where “fun” takes on a whole new meaning.

“In Palestine, we are depressed, we have the occupation and dealing with so many issues we can't even think about fun but I think its also normal Arabic mentality to be conservative in nature.”

Meanwhile, Naseem at The Black Iris of Jordan talks about the socio-political messages a simple t-shirt can deliver when it comes to the Arab-Israeli conflict.

Will at Kabobfest has a review of Mohammed Alatar’s film “The Iron Wall” that documents his experiences with checkpoints, settlements and walls.

“In one of the most gripping scenes, it shows Palestinian farmers reacting as Israelis cut down their olive trees to make way for the wall. One of the farmers jumps on the fallen trees and cries “my olives, my father!” as soldiers subdue him.”

Turab (soil or earth in Arabic) is an ensemble of seven musicians living in Palestine. Iman takes a look at their first album “Hada Leil”; a collection of original songs based on lyrics by contemporary Palestinian poets.

Last but not least, Osaid Rasheed looks at the negative affects that restrictions of movement have had on the health parameters of Palestinians, especially with the draining of funds from the international community due to the election of Hamas.

1 comment

  • […] Global Voices: The shelling of a Gaza beach few days ago which resulted in several deaths, continues to be a priority story for Palestinian bloggers this week; specifically the unresolved issue of responsibility. [read] Elmo Loves to Share…These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages. […]

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