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Pressuring change through blogging

Following the quote I took from Brunei Resources's blog;

 "We (the government) require pressure from outside and this is where blog readers can come in to help spread the knowledge."

and my subsequent call for more Bruneian Bloggers to help aid progress in the country;

"If only there are more of us!" 

LSM churned out a post in OurLocalStyle that digged much deeper and said that the issue is not in number – it is in substance. 

Brunei bloggers can pressure a change be it in the education system or in the larger setting of society. I don’t think the problem lies in getting people to blog or even to get them to leave comments. Rather, it’s in encouraging thought-provoking posts and discussions relevant to the Brunei paradigm.

This was then followed by a comment cum blogpost by One Way Down The Highway which highlights the possibilities that the lack of substance is connected to the nature of the Bruneian Education System which does not really encourage "thinking outside the box".

Your assertion “Brunei bloggers can pressure a change be it in the education system…” is a chicken and egg situation. Brunei’s education system does not sufficiently provide us with the necessary skills to articulate such tasks. And majority of the minority naturally endowed with such gifts run as fast as they can, anywhere, to get away from the system that once stifled, and still does, their ability to think and belief that they can change the nation for better.

2 comments

  • […] UPDATE: My latest article at GVO is available here. Again, a round up of recent posts made in Brunei Blogosphere.   […]

  • […] A late addition to the issue concerning pressuring change in the government through blogging is Zul Funkmasta. He postulates that not only the education system that does not encourage voicing out ideas, but it is also the Bruneian culture of discouraging the voicing out of ideas, concerns and criticisms. We can blame it on the education system or even our own culture for this 'sydrome'. The idea of voicing out ideas, concerns and criticisms are some what not part of our 'operating system'. […]

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