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Nepal Movement, Day 3: Shoot At Sight Order

The king of Nepal keeps pushing himself into a tighter corner. He has taken the penultimate step. He has imposed daytime curfew for two days in a row. But it is clear the movement has now become a revolution.

United We Blog has stories of interest including one where the lead blogger himself takes part in the “revolution.” General Strike Day III Updates.

Since the curfew is on around, I am, as many others, passing time by watching television. Television news has become the source of information on what’s happening in the city (other than watching around my house from the roof)…. After the killing, Pokhara witnessed the biggest rally after the people protested the killing……. Chitwan has been declared democratic zone after the people forced police to flee the scene and took control over the governmental offices.

The Kaushaltar Story, Curfew! Clashes! Communication cut-off!

Kaushaltar and its surrounding is not big and by the number of local participants in such program, I now say that people are uprising for the revolution.

Democracy For Nepal takes a strong stand. Shoot At Sight Order: Dead End For The King, Protests (photos), Constituent Assembly: 300 Seats Of Roughly Equal Population, Crime, Organized Crime, Terrorism, State Terrorism, The Police, The Army Need To Stop Following Illegitimate Orders. The blog talks of a revolutionary parliament.

The 1999 House that will function under an interim constitution. It will have revolutionary powers. It could declare the country a republic. It could purge the entire army top brass. It could do things like that. It could send Kamal Thapa and the king to jail, for example.

Mero Sansar has some great on the ground coverage. The blog is in Nepali, but it is the only one doing video clips from the scene. There are several: video clips 1, video clips 2, video clips 3.

2 comments

  • It’s sad to observe how international politics works. King Gyanendra can be easily removed by some help from some well-directed “external help”. The problem is, there is a very thin line — but then, there is not — that divides restoring democracy in Iraq and restoring it in countries like Nepal and Pakistan. Vested interests come upper most, people be damned.

  • Why is it that your links do not point to the resource but to the sites ? I believe your work would add value if you could take the visitors to the real place where the articles are covered. Instead of writing blablabla.com has done this, could you please write blablabla.com/thisarticle.html ??? etc ? I believe a much detailed review of the sites that you wished to offer would have provided you those links. Hope to read more of your stuff and oh yes, the links too.

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