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Valentine and the U2 in the Moroccan blogs

No political posts in the Moroccan blogosphere last week, or at least very rare. It seems the Moroccan bloggers opted for lighter subjects, in order to mark a pause, after the very political week dominated by the Danish cartoons.

Bono in Morocco

Supertimba is in the United States on assignment. He writes about his first impressions of the Uncle Sam's country. His post is a funny yet interesting diary about the American journey of this ” Moroccan lost in translation “ (French) as he likes to call himself.

Indians (of India) in America have nothing to do with Shah Ruk Khan and they do feel offended if you talk to them about Bollywood ..

Once again, Samir has the scoop, and he annouces that the guest speaker for Fez Encounters 2006 will be rock mega-star Bono, the lead singer and songwriter with Irish band U2.

You heard it here first! Never let it be said that we don't let you know every bit of rumour and gossip in the medina!


Lemrina is wishing everybody a Happy Valentine day, and she writes in her latest post about Saint Valentine the doctor who became a priest (French) and died in jail to become a martyre commemorated every 14 th of February.

Lady M is spending her Valentine day alone (French), and she writes a funny note about the way she used to celebrate the lovers's day. But please, no worries, she didn't split with her husband. Robert is in Great Britain and he'll be soon back to his Lady author of the blog Chez Rasade.

Selma writes a melancolic post filled with emotions, about a certain cafe where she can forget everything (French) except a certain person she seems to cherish in a very special way .

Back to politics

IBAHRINE posts the article published by the Economist.com about the corporations having a hard time making friends. Especially after the scandals at Enron and WorldCom destroyed thousands of employees’ livelihoods.

The spread of “ social media ” across the internet—such as online discussion groups, e-mailing lists and blogs—has brought forth a new breed of brand assassin, who can materialise from nowhere and savage a firm's reputation. Often the assault is warranted; sometimes it is not. But accuracy is not necessarily the issue.

Chighaf posts about Sidi Moumen, a very poor neighborhood in Casablanca. And she wondered when is the Moroccan government going to find a solution (French) that can guaranty a decent life to thousands of Moroccans who still live in this notorious slum area.

You don't imagin what it means to be ashamed of his home and neighborhood..everytime I go there, my heart hearts..I'm sick of witnessing those kids ‘s eyes changing from happy to hateful .. to desperate..

Soumiaz who started a very interesting e-debat about Islam and Laicity is sad to realise that some bloggers comment to only hurt her, and not to positively participate in the e-debat.

Why is this the way it is? i really i am sad and i am afraid there ‘s not much we can do to change this world, if people instead of giving you a positive feedback to help you understand .. they try to discourage you..

Back to Riadzany which latest post is about a decision taken at a meeting of information ministers last week in Cairo. And it's about giving the Arab image a new look. A makeover story!!

The media action plan adopted will be developed on the international stage and spread over five years. The aim is to “correct the distorted image given to Arabs abroad”. Around $22.5m has been set aside to finance this plan, payable over the next five years, according to the contribution of each state to the Arab League budget.

A taste of MoroccoImages of Morocco
Visit Crucivore and you'll love the pictures he's posting . Homey and very reflective of Fez the beautiful .

Samir offered me this picture, and i loved it so much that i feel like sharing it with you.

That's it for today. See you next Wednesday, Inshallah ;)

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