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Kenyan Sphere Roundup

First thing, condolences to the families of Kenyans who died as a result of the collapse of a six storey building in Nairobi on monday. As reported by the Standard newspaper, “At least 10 people were confirmed dead. By 10.45 pm at least 75 victims, with various degrees of injuries, had been pulled out of the heap of concrete blocks and dust.” Acolyte on reading about the collapse of the building, notes at the end of this post “That's so sad.It seems people never seem to learn from similar disasters of the past.Are we destined to repeat our mistakes ad infinitum?”

The African blogosphere ‘hit the mainstream press’ as noted by Kenyan Pundit, the standard newspaper did a piece “Working Abroad, Living at home” about the kenyan blogosphere.

Some of Kenya’s best writers are people I can almost guarantee you have never heard of and probably never read.

Their writing has never been published in newspapers or books, yet their observations and commentary happen to be some of the most mordant, witty and original.

The Standard piece specifically pointed to the post “Having cake and eating it”, where M urges diaspora kenyans to move back to Kenya. The post generated alot of discussion, and introduced an interesting set of abbreviations such as KT (Kenyan Tourist – diaspora kenyan returning for a visit), and KR (Kenyan Roots – Kenyans living and working in Kenyan). The discussion included the question of whether remittance from diaspora kenyans can be considered nation building. Commentary from Diaspora kenyans/bloggers made for a very spirited discussion.

The week also began with the news that a report by Kenya's former anti corruption chief was published. John Githongo stepped down a year ago; he had been investigating corruption, including the Anglo Leasing Scandal. Ntwiga has a clear rundown of this in the post“Business as usual in nairobi 3.o”.
Mental acrobatics in an impassioned post takes issue with characterisation of John Githongo as a dissapointment, pointing out that

“… he stood up, laid down his conditions and took a job that most of us would have ran away from like we were being chased by Conjestina Achieng and actually left with his integrity and his neck in check. We complain and complain about the political elite being one and the same. Orange, Banana, KANU, DP, LDP all the same. And here is a man who was invited into the top tier of that political elite and refused to be turned. In short the kind of man we have been calling for and instead of lauding him, we label him a coward”

In the same vein, Diary of a mad kenyan woman lauds John Githongo saying “John Githongo, I salute you, for the man you are, the hope you give and for the gift of your courage.”

Afrikan Eye examines our so-called bullet proof beliefs, and asks “what, I wonder, is the point of having sound ideological/spiritual beliefs and principles if those beliefs do not affect how one's life is lived?” in the same post she adds “Until we answer that question most of us will continue to bang on about how we ‘believe in Afrikan development’ when, in reality, we believe in buying imported Belgian chocolate.”

Afrofeminista says “Leave Kikuyu's alone”. Kikuyu is one of the major tribes in Kenya, where tribalism (akin to racism) is often an issue to contend with in Kenyan life. She notes that the real struggle should be against patriachy “….More’s the pity, given that we’re trying to fight patriarchy, a system which tends to also manifest itself in movements that seek to ‘restore’, ‘reclaim’ some idea of tribal supremacy – be it by misguided Kikuyu, Luo or Kalenjin leaders. So we just add another battle to the one we’re already fighting, which is unfortunate.”

Bankelele provides an update of business news and opportunities, noting therein that “The European Union will set up its own trust fund to disburse aid to Africa without reference to the World Bank which is currently led by U.S. neo-conservative Paul Wolfowitz.”

Girl in the meadow laments the overplaying of songs by Kenya's Kiss FM, “..And to make matters worse , they don't pay the artistes royalties. What is worse Kiss FM or Pirates in the streets?”

Ms K shares her thoughts of going to the gym in the hilarious post “the random mind of a tortured gym rat”.

Last but not least, white african discusses the african perspective on monetizing of blogs.

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