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Kenya: Anglo-leasing

The Girl in the Meadow wonders whether in the light of the Anglo-leasing scandal in Kenya, the media is corrupt?….Is it true that editors of Newspapers are often paid to kill stories? (a rumour)”


  • Erick Otieno

    That the media is corrupt in Kenya cannot be denied. But with an increasingly enlightened population, editors and publishers have realised that slanting stories or killing some to favour certain interests leads to diminishing audience numbers as happened to Citizen after the referendum and Nation after Narc took over power. Now media houses and journalists have bcome more bolder, always treading on hitherto considered dangerous paths of big people in the government in abid to unmask their shaddy deals.

  • Robert Kapsowe

    Some media houses in Kenya are really independent. Without going into names, news on anglo-leasing scam have sometime competed for headline with Goldenberg which should not be the case. The main news now in Kenya is on anglo-leasing.Kiraitu Murungi, former Energy Minister is blaming the press for his down fall. That is not true. Nobody is celebrating because he has been hounded out of office. Kibaki should now fire his Vice President for misleading parliament on Angloleasing.
    Other ministers who should be fired include Kimunya, Karua and Attorney General Amos Wako.

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