Close

Support Global Voices

To stay independent, free, and sustainable, our community needs the help of friends and readers like you.

Donate now »

Eid Al Adha unites the Moroccan bloggers and Marock divides them

This week, Muslims all over the world are celbrating Aid Al Adha to commemorate Abraham's sacrifice.
Moroccan bloggers didn't miss the occasion to wish everybody a Merry celebration.

Eid Mubarak

In a funny note, Mehdi wishes a Happy Eid to his readers and he informs them (French link) that “have u bought the sheep or not yet?” is among the most asked questions in Googles Top 10!!

Bsima too seems very happy to post about the Eid although she makes sure to remind her readers of the essence of the celebration :giving to the needy (French link).

In his serious way, Amazigh hopes that Moroccans will be able to celebrate their Eid without fear of the credit they spend the rest of their life paying for it (French link)…

Marock disturbs..

It was interesting to follow an e-debate about Marock , a Moroccan movie that created the event in The 8th edition of the National Film Festival that was held last month in Tangier .

Casaoui was the first to write about this movie that was assaulted by journalists and even movie directors after its screening in Tangier .

He thinks that the main factor behind what happened to Marock lies in the courage of its Director, who dared to talk about what Casaoui considers to be the biggest Taboo in Morocco (French link) and which is the sex and the religion.

Many Moroccan intellectuals are still living in the past, and they refuse to realise that Morocco has changed and that our youth refuse to believe in fairy tells and pretend to be happy.

Karim in the other hand talks about Marock by analysing a column about the movie written last month by Karim Boukhari (French link) .

Although both Karim and Boukhari focus mainly on the love scene that was the center of the polemic ,they totally disagree when it comes to its interpretation .
And while Boukhari sees the rejection of the love scene as a form of a rising antisemitism in Morocco, Karim thinks that airing such shot wont help changing things any better.

I think that many Moroccans will have a symbolic interpretation of this love scene .
And the same way the popular cake shared in the patio of a cuban hotel in the second part of “The Godfather” symbolized the Cuban nation being exploited by foreign capitalist interest, here the Jewish guy deflorating the Muslim girl will definitely be interpreted as the intrusion of sionists in the Arabs’ circles of power and will then cause the opposite of the goal that the producers aimed to achieve.

Karim, author of the Arab observers ends his post asking Marock's director to be more mature while dealing with sensitive matters especially when it concerns a society that cosiders decency to be its main value.

Bluesman considers the assault of the movie a barbaric act although he realises that it's not the only non-democratic reaction that occured lately in Morocco (Arabic link).

The view from Fez and Tangier

Samir author of The view from Fes talks in his post about the appeal that Morocco has for foreign investors .
He also notices that if the “conservation/renovation” ethos is alive amongst a small group , not all investors have an eye for heritage or cultural values.

It has to be asked.What is this doing to the local economies,to the society, to “ordinary Moroccans”?Riads and Dars that housed extended families are being vacated to make way for trendy couples who want part of the “next big thing”.
A riad or Dar that once cost around 30-40 thousands Euros is now likely to bring well over 100,000..

Mehdi7 reports in his latest post about the new wave of demolition that's occuring in Tangier in the process of renovating the city, and he wonders if this won't make Tangier a city of rich since no poor citizen will afford the new prices (French link) of the new renovating places.

Some comments to the post showed a certain fear of a déjà vu situation.
It's about Marrakesh that -according to a comment to Mehdi's post- became unreachable for “ordinary Moroccans” after being renovated.

Rumor has it..

Amina Talhimet posted last week about the rumor that she considers a national sport in Morocco.
She says that no one is safe from the rumor neither the King nor the normal citizen.

We still don't realise that it takes few simple words to destroy families, lives..

Amina considers that the main factor behind the rumor is the hatred, a poison she thinks pollutes Morocco and blocks its development (French link).

In a totally different décor, Leglandeur posts what I see as the sweetest definition of blogging.
He explains how it helps the blogger survive the mediocrity (French link) surrounding him.

I borrow the breath of the bloggers and live their experiences as a privilege and as an elevation which like a poem, sometimes elevates me and sometimes loses me.

Isn'it cute!

Coup de coeur

I'll introduce you this week to a very artistic blog.Label ash shows the interest of its author Amine to the art in general and especially the music. The posts are very interesting and each time you have Amine’ opinion about an exhibit or a musical show, with sometimes a kind of journal blogging.
I liked his latest post about François-Marie Banier and found the details very interesting (French link).

Najlae is another blog i want you to discover. The author, Najlae, calls herself “a journalist lost in translation”, and you can feel, reading her posts, how much she misses her friends and the tranquility of home sweet home. In general, she posts short stories, but sometimes she reacts to special political events happening around her. Najlae writes most of the time in French.

That's it for this week. See you next Wednesday, Inshallah;)

5 comments

  • Thanx foulla.

    U’ll be back soon to ur country… We miss u :)
    kiss

  • salam
    thnaks folla

  • Another great post, thanks Foulla.

  • J’aime bien ton approche journalistique chère Farah
    tu fais un travail qui rend bien compte de la blogosphère marocaine et surtout reflète fidèlement la diversité de son contenu et de ses membres.
    La majorité des blogs marocains est francophone et grâce à toi les internautes anglophones prendront connaissance de la dynamique et de l’apport des marocains à la blogosphère mondiale. Je t’en remercie.
    Faudrait un jour que tu parle également d’un excellent blog d’une certaine foulla :)

  • shar

    Can any one tell me is Eid on one day in Marrocco or is it Saturday and Sunday as in some parts of the UK.

    Thanks

    Shar

Join the conversation

Authors, please log in »

Guidelines

  • All comments are reviewed by a moderator. Do not submit your comment more than once or it may be identified as spam.
  • Please treat others with respect. Comments containing hate speech, obscenity, and personal attacks will not be approved.

Love reading Global Voices?

Help us understand our readers by completing a quick survey »

Close