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Echoes from the Tunisian blogosphere

The results for the Tunisian Blog Awards were announced, here in French and here in English.

Tarek writes about “Tree of Paradise”, an exhibition of mosaics at the Brooklyn Museum in New York, in which some mosaics from a synagogue in Hammam Lif, Tunisia, are showcased.
He gives an interesting insight into the background of these mosaics and explains their importance.

Zizou is happy to see that shopping malls in Tunisia are playing a role in creating a little book reading revolution by making books more available and accessible to people, and putting an end to a time when only a few people would have to go to dusty bookstores, with unfriendly librarians, to search for books. Now no one hesitates to grab a book or two while they're doing their shopping. (in French)

MMM writes about how he thinks that what we need is not a new and modernized Islam, but a new and modernized understanding of Islam.

Tunisian Globetrotter announces the launch of an online radio station by the supporters of the Tunisian soccer team, Club Africain. The radio will be covering the club's news, events and matches. (in French)

Sup'Comian boy has noticed that news and information about the Internet and Telecom world is somehow a common interest in the Tunisian blogosphere and suggests the creation of a group blog covering these issues in Tunisia. (in French)

Tarek is sick and tired of salespeople who are trained to intimidate customers and make them disburse the most. He talks about his experience buying a laptop recently, and how the salesperson kept trying to convince him to buy more accessories and a 3 year warranty.

Nawarat is writing an article about female Tunisian bloggers for a Tunisian female magazine, and she is inviting female Tunisian bloggers to help her with the article by answering some questions or suggesting some ideas. (in French)

Jrayda writes about the differences in dialect between the people from the capital, Tunis, and the people from the south of Tunisia, as well as the funny situations that occur because of those differences. (in French)

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