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Peruvian Blogs Recently

La versión original de este artículo está disponible en español.

These days have been active, politically speaking, as various bloggers have posted frequently about recent happenings and among them all, the one that called my attention the most was written by “La Morena” about the candidate of the ruling political party: De Guatemala a Guatepeor con los Chakanos in which reading it, we discover that, for Morena, simply being a successful business man isn't enough to be a good candidate. In any case, past news items make it clearnthat not everything is said aloud, not even in the estates of the “Perú Posibilistas.” One problem is that the comments don't appear to be complete, but you can see them here. In the blog Peruvian Culture, Gustavo Garcia presents us with a list of candidates and possible candidates for the upcoming presidential elections: “Ensalada de Candidatos in 2006” and ends the post with a “congressional reggaeton” alluding to the absurdity of the “Patriotic Fathers.” The bloggers of Perú Político post a summary of the most important news from the past week: Crónica semanal (30 de noviembre al 6 de diciembre) and in Página Libre, Fernando Cáceres reflects about democracy and our political class in “El Peru en su propio laberinto (Peru in its Own Maze). Finally, in a post entitled “A la Plaza,” Angelo laments a decision by Lima's “Comuna” to not allow Plaza San Martín to be used for political meetings.

In other aspects of the Peruvian blogosphere, Ecoperú posts about the ecological problems being caused by the gas pipeline of Camisea: “Machiguengas vs Camisea. Juan Carlos Luján of Sin Papel, in a post titled “El mensaje que no trascendió en la CADE 2005,” informs us of the exposition at CADE 2005 – a conference for the political and business classes of Peru – of León Trahtemberg who “garnered applause from the audience by analyzing the relationship among the social sectors, the authoritarianism in the schools (where “plagiarize, march, and keep quiet” is the common denominator), and the candidates that charm the masses with easy speeches without receiving skeptical questioning.

From the Southern city of Puno, Eland Vera of Comunicación y Desarrollo Peru, in the post “Puno's Bloggers of the National University of Altiplano,” tells us of his teaching experiences using blogs. And, speaking of blogging, Nauta posts “Blogs con rostro (Blogs with Faces)” which favors the option of identity over anonymity when blogging. FutbolPeruano.com informs us of recent news in Peruvian sports in the post, “Copa Libertadores 2006: Lottery Did Not Favor Peruvian Teams.”

Discussing music events, Germán of MusicBlog / M&S offers his impressions of a recent performance by the salsa group, Niche in “Crónica de un concierto anunciado (I) y (II). Enrike who writes at Cámara de Gas shares his experiences at the concert of heavy metal band, Napalm Death, in “Napalm Death en Perú” and later tells us that the group liked Peru and the good vibes at the concert.

Related to culture, Seycko of Réplica posts “Fotos de Magda” about the first solo exposition of photographer Magdalena Sangalli. Juan Carlos Bondy of Lado B tells us about the publishing delay of a prizewinning collection of poetry and short stories in “Winners and Finalists of the 2002 Copé Award.” And Javier Agreda writes about a recent book by Peruvian author, Luis Hernán Castañeda in a post titled “Hotel Europa.”

Among the more personal posts, Fernando Lozano writes about friendship and being Peruvian in “Cuando pienses en volver, Daniel (When do you think you'll return Daniel?).” And Sergio of Idioteca recounts his weekend in “Lights, Music, Beer, Bloggers, and Graffiti.” And with that, I'll see you the next time.

Translated by David Sasaki

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