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Echoes from the Tunisian blogosphere

The 8th Tunisian blogger meetup was held last Friday with international guests Rebecca MacKinnon, Jeff Ooi, Mite Nishio and Isam Bayazidi. A lot of blogs followed here, here, here, here and here.

Adib, Chouchitou and Metal Mad write (in French) about the death of famous and passionate Tunisian photographer Bechir El Manoubi who attended and photographed all the big sporting events Tunisia participated in. He also met and took photos of the biggest Tunisian stars. He is famous for his sombrero, that he got from Mexico while he was with the Tunisian soccer team in the 1978 World Cup, and all the flags and badges he wears.

Bachir El Manoubi
Bechir El Manoubi

Iskander writes about how his several travels to Spain make him wonder how the Muslim civilization, that shined during the days of Al Andalus, has now gone so low. He talks about the modernization of Islam and how we should learn from those times by spreading tolerance and openness (in French).

Zizou writes about the Tunis Marathon that will be taking place this Sunday and suggests we have a Tunisian blogger team running. He thinks it'd be a good change from the cool cafés we usually meet in (in French).

Mochekes is excited about the new MMS service by Tunisiana and the 50 free MMS messages they offer, which he thinks it's a great marketing move by the company. He also favorably compares it with Tunisie Telecom's offering (in French).

Houssein updated the Tunisie Blogs aggregator with a new design and added random photos of Tunisia from flickr, events from upcoming.org, as well as some news and activites in Tunisia.

Aziz talks about the Tunisian rumor creating talent and how it worked at the WSIS with a bunch of rumors surrounding the $100 laptop and that they were selling some at the ICT4ALL expo (in French).

Sup'Comian boy thinks that the Tunisian blogs still don't truly reflect the Tunisian society, belonging to people who are different from most of the masses, and somehow idealistic (in French).

Tom gives a full account about meeting and having dinner with Richard Stallman, the father of open source, at Dar Bach Hamba in Tunis, and how great an experience it was for him.

MMM puts up some photos that he took from the ICT4ALL Expo at the World Summit on the Information Society.

8 comments

  • good synthese mmm!
    the new Tn blog is very interesting!
    thank you !

  • c’était le compte rendu très politiquement correct de la blogosphère tunisienne.

    en matière d’autocensure on ne peut mieux faire.

  • @ K-pax: qu’est ce que tu rajouterais pour que ca soit représentatif?

  • azizi K-pax
    je te propose de faire un resume a ta maniere … juste pour voir l’autre son de cloche !

  • […] As some of you already know, I’m working with GVO as Middle East/N. Africa Editor, for the last few months. During which, I made so many new online friends and met authors from all around the world, and specially the rocking Middle East & North Africa authors team. […]

  • chers DjBouzz et Zizou.

    primo. j’ai donné mon avis sur un post. comme tout le monde donne son avis à propos de n’importe quel post sur n’importe quel blog.

    deusio. ce n’est pas à moi de faire mon compte rendu ici. on ne me l’a pas demandé. car ce n’est pas moi qui est en charge de cette rubrique.

    et entre nous je n’aime pas ce genre de remarques “à la tunisienne” qui sous-entend la chose suivante : tu ne fais que critiquer, montre-nous ce que tu peux faire si tu étais à la place du bonhomme. ça n’a aucun sens et c’est ridicule. et c’est justement parce que je ne suis pas à la place du bonhomme et que je me sens bien dans la place où je suis que je critique. le jour où on me chargera de faire un compte rendu de la blogosphère tunisienne je refuserai clairement de le faire si jamais je sais à l’avance que ce compte rendu ne sera pas objectif car il aura occulté une partie des impressions des blogueurs sur tel sujet ou tel autre (et quel sujet !). on pourra tjs argumenter que le contenu du compte rendu est un choix personnel, donc subjectif. ça serait un argument trop facile pour esquiver le fond du problème.

  • @ K-Pax: tu te trompes sur mes intentions… je voulais juste savoir ce qui manquait au compte rendu de subzero. C’est sûr qu’une seule personne ne peut pas faire un compte rendu qui plait à tout le monde. Primo le compte rendu va dépendre de ses interets… et deusio c impossible qu’il puisse lire tous les posts de tous les bloggeurs tunisiens. Tu disais que le revue de blog de subzero n’était pas représentative et je voulais juste te donner l’opportunité de la compléter…j’ai vraiment envie d’avoir un compte rendu représentatif pour aller faire un tour sur les blogs intéressants que subzero n’a pas mentionné. Je suis désolé si ma question t’a dérangé. Peace!

  • @DjBouZz. “pas d’trouble” comme on dit chez vous à Québec :) encore une fois, c’est pas mon job de faire des compte rendus sur Global Voices. j’ai réagi en lecteur (averti).

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